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Winklevoss twins stuff $1m into social network for the FILTHY RICH

Zuck on that, Mark

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Wanna know what the world's been lacking? A social network for hedge-fund bods, of course. And who better to be at the helm of such a brave Web2.0 venture than square-jawed Olympic rowing twins Cameron and Tyler Winklevoss - who rose from the ashes of their legal spat with Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg to plunge some of their settlement cash into SumZero.

The brothers have reportedly invested $1m into a pal's social networking site for investors, according to the Wall Street Journal.

Last year, the pair lost a lawsuit filed in a US court that attempted to plump up an earlier $65m settlement with Facebook and its founder Zuckerberg. Since that bruising - surely eased by millions of dollars - the Winklevoss boys have been relatively quiet, apart from a TV ad turn punting salty nuts.

Now they're back with a stack of cash for their long-term biz partner Divya Narendra, who founded SumZero in 2008 and who also attacked Facebook in the same lawsuit with the Winklevoss twins.

Speaking to the WSJ, Tyler said "the band is back together", referring to their latest partnership with Narendra, which operated rival Facebook site ConnectU.

As dramatised by the Hollywood movie The Social Network, Zuck - during his time at Harvard University - agreed in 2003 to complete software code on ConnectU for the three men, only to delay work on that project while developing what was then referred to as "the Facebook".

Today, Facebook's wild growth has led to a global userbase that stands at nearly 1 billion people - even as the company's shares continue to wobble on the NYSE over concerns by admen and the social network's slow response to the gigantic smartphone market.

Four-year-old SumZero claims 7,500 members with applications to join the site personally vetted by Narendra, who apparently rejects about 75 per cent of them. He's clearly hoping, however, to attract more investors to actually use the site, hence the injection of the strapping oarsmen. ®

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