Feeds

BT gets postcode knickers in twist, plants Shoreditch on Mount Everest

And the Silicon Roundabout is nowhere to be seen!

Beginner's guide to SSL certificates

A website set up by BT to help its customers track the progress of when their local telephone exchange will be souped up with superfast fibre broadband goodness is currently displaying a dodgy bug in the postcode checker.

Anyone typing in N1, which is the postcode for Islington, north London, will instead be greeted with a map of the city of Bloemfontein in South Africa.

An apparently barren Islington bereft of theatre-goers and Tony Blairs

The same thing happens when the E1 postcode, which covers parts of east London including Aldgate, Mile End, Stepney and - gasp - Shoreditch, is typed in into BT's site. But this time we're cheerily relocated to Mount Everest, where we doubt any telephone exchanges operate.

Hang on, has the Bongster relocated to Silicon Mount Everest?

And we could go on, west London's W1, for example, brings us all the way to Algeria. The flaw isn't just restricted to postcodes ending in the number one, either.

Wood Green's N22 takes us on a journey of discovery to the good ol' US of A in Jacksonville, North Carolina.

Grey N22 finally granted some Florida sunshine

Of course, that's not to say that every postcode is screwed. Here's a zoomed-out shot of SE16 showing the correct map and information about the status of exchanges in that part of London.

BT has used Google Maps to display the geographical information. It might want to have a word with the Chocolate Factory about its system, or else speak to the developer who designed the "Where and when" website without first testing that the thing actually works as stated.

The Register has kindly notified BT of the cockup. So we apologise in advance if the system is now working correctly, or else has altogether slipped offline...

Skiing beanie hat tip to reader Malcolm Melville for alerting Vulture Central to BT failing its GCSE geography exam. ®

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

More from The Register

next story
Crouching tiger, FAST ASLEEP dragon: Smugglers can't shift iPhone 6s
China's grey market reports 'sluggish' sales of Apple mobe
Sea-Me-We 5 construction starts
New sub cable to go live 2016
EE coughs to BROKEN data usage metrics BLUNDER that short-changes customers
Carrier apologises for 'inflated' measurements cockup
Comcast: Help, help, FCC. Netflix and pals are EXTORTIONISTS
The others guys are being mean so therefore ... monopoly all good, yeah?
Surprise: if you work from home you need the Internet
Buffer-rage sends Aussies out to experience road rage
EE buys 58 Phones 4u stores for £2.5m after picking over carcass
Operator says it will safeguard 359 jobs, plans lick of paint
MOST iPhone strokers SPURN iOS 8: iOS 7 'un-updatening' in 5...4...
Guess they don't like our battery-draining update?
prev story

Whitepapers

Providing a secure and efficient Helpdesk
A single remote control platform for user support is be key to providing an efficient helpdesk. Retain full control over the way in which screen and keystroke data is transmitted.
Intelligent flash storage arrays
Tegile Intelligent Storage Arrays with IntelliFlash helps IT boost storage utilization and effciency while delivering unmatched storage savings and performance.
Beginner's guide to SSL certificates
De-mystify the technology involved and give you the information you need to make the best decision when considering your online security options.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.
Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops
Balancing user privacy and privileged access, in accordance with compliance frameworks and legislation. Evaluating any potential remote control choice.