Feeds

Who'll save the 100 most endangered species? Microsoft, apparently

No, not Nokia engineers. Well, not this time

Choosing a cloud hosting partner with confidence

Microsoft has pledged software and expertise in a battle to save the world's most endangered species - and we don't mean Nokia engineers.

In partnership with the International Union for the Conservation of Nature (IUCN), the 'Softies are helping to track and trace the world's 100 most at risk species, including a mushroom that lives only in a small part of Wales and world's smallest, slowest sloth - the Pygmy Three-Toed sloth.

The IUCN announces a Red List every year of species closest to extinction including animals, fungi and plants. 2012's Red List was presented yesterday in South Korea at the IUCN annual Congress and Welsh fungi Willow's Blister and the tiny island Pygmy Sloth are unlucky enough to make the grade.

Sandbill Piper, also endangered, credit IUCN Baz Scampion

Don't worry little bird, Microsoft is coming: The Spoonbilled Sandpiper, also endangered

Microsoft has produced a new software application, designed at one of its research labs in Cambridge, UK, which will allow the IUCN to track and model ecosystems much more efficiently. It will let the IUCN add spatial-data to information about endangered animals and map trends.

Getting all the facts and figures about threatened sloths in one places is very important, said Dr Simon Stuart, of the IUCN:

IUCN is the steward of a vast amount of expert knowledge and our work with Microsoft will ensure that we have an ever increasing amount of up to date and accurate information available for conservationists and others.

Conservationists at the event also published a report "Priceless or Worthless" highlighting one pitfall of the conservation movement - that we tend to only rescue animals considered useful to the human race. And not all of these animals on the list can be sold as "useful". Or even cute, judging by photos of Willow's Blister.

“All species have a value to nature and thus in turn to humans,” says Dr Stuart:

Although the value of some species may not appear obvious at first, all species in fact contribute in their way to the healthy functioning of the planet.

®

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

More from The Register

next story
GRAV WAVE DRAMA: 'Big Bang echo' may have been grit on the scanner – boffins
Exit Planet Dust on faster-than-light expansion of universe
Mine Bitcoins with PENCIL and PAPER
Forget Sudoku, crunch SHA-256 algos
SpaceX Dragon cargo truck flies 3D printer to ISS: Clawdown in 3, 2...
Craft berths at space station with supplies, experiments, toys
'This BITE MARK is a SMOKING GUN': Boffins probe ancient assault
Tooth embedded in thigh bone may tell who pulled the trigger
DOLPHINS SMELL MAGNETS – did we hear that right, boffins?
Xavier's School for Gifted Magnetotaceans
Big dinosaur wowed females with its ENORMOUS HOOTER
That's right, Doris, I've got biggest snout in the prehistoric world
Japanese volcano eruption reportedly leaves 31 people presumed dead
Hopes fade of finding survivors on Mount Ontake
That glass of water you just drank? It was OLDER than the SUN
One MEELLION years older. Some of it anyway
Canberra drone team dances a samba in Outback Challenge
CSIRO's 'missing bushwalker' found and watered
prev story

Whitepapers

Forging a new future with identity relationship management
Learn about ForgeRock's next generation IRM platform and how it is designed to empower CEOS's and enterprises to engage with consumers.
Storage capacity and performance optimization at Mizuno USA
Mizuno USA turn to Tegile storage technology to solve both their SAN and backup issues.
The next step in data security
With recent increased privacy concerns and computers becoming more powerful, the chance of hackers being able to crack smaller-sized RSA keys increases.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.
A strategic approach to identity relationship management
ForgeRock commissioned Forrester to evaluate companies’ IAM practices and requirements when it comes to customer-facing scenarios versus employee-facing ones.