Feeds

HP throws an extra 2,000 staff onto chopping block

29,000 bods at risk of redundancy, morale problematic

5 things you didn’t know about cloud backup

HP has added an extra two thousand workers to its mass redundancy programme, it confirmed today.

Back in May the troubled US tech titan threatened to axe 27,000 jobs by the end of fiscal 2014 to cut overheads and use some of the savings to invest in R&D. However, in a 10Q form filed today with US financial watchdog SEC, HP revealed an upwards shift in the potential body count.

"The restructuring plan includes both a voluntary early retirement program for eligible US employees and non-voluntary workforce reductions and is expected to result in 29,000 employees exiting the company by the end of that period," Hewlett-Packard declared in its paperwork.

The firm has been hit hard by falling demand for printer hardware and consumables, and rocked by the shift in buying habits toward tablets and smartphones instead of traditional PCs.

In response, HP has already folded together its printer and PC businesses and cobbled together the enterprise servers, storage and networking unit with the global accounts and services teams. The firm is also centralising its marketing and communications functions.

"We are working to improve our execution and financial performance and to align our cost structure with our revenue and margin profile," HP stated.

"These efforts are designed to enable us to invest in our business to respond to industry shifts and capitalise on emerging opportunities in areas like cloud computing, security, and information management," it added.

There's nothing like a regulatory filing to get a better view of what's going on under a company's hood. HP said there are "significant risks" associated with its actions that could stall the redundancy plan or harm its business, including delays to implementation caused by the "highly regulated" regions of Europe and Asia.

It added "decreases in staff morale and the failure to meet operational targets due to the loss of employees" were also potential issues it deemed worth highlighting to investors. ®

Boost IT visibility and business value

More from The Register

next story
6 Obvious Reasons Why Facebook Will Ban This Article (Thank God)
Clampdown on clickbait ... and El Reg is OK with this
Mozilla's 'Tiles' ads debut in new Firefox nightlies
You can try turning them off and on again
No, thank you. I will not code for the Caliphate
Some assignments, even the Bongster decline must
Banking apps: Handy, can grab all your money... and RIDDLED with coding flaws
Yep, that one place you'd hoped you wouldn't find 'em
TROLL SLAYER Google grabs $1.3 MEEELLION in patent counter-suit
Chocolate Factory hits back at firm for suing customers
Kaspersky backpedals on 'done nothing wrong, nothing to fear' blather
Founder (and internet passport fan) now says privacy is precious
Primetime precrime? Minority Report TV series 'being developed'
I have to know. I have to find out what happened to my life
Ex-IBM CEO John Akers dies at 79
An era disrupted by the advent of the PC
prev story

Whitepapers

Gartner critical capabilities for enterprise endpoint backup
Learn why inSync received the highest overall rating from Druva and is the top choice for the mobile workforce.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Rethinking backup and recovery in the modern data center
Combining intelligence, operational analytics, and automation to enable efficient, data-driven IT organizations using the HP ABR approach.
Consolidation: The Foundation for IT Business Transformation
In this whitepaper learn how effective consolidation of IT and business resources can enable multiple, meaningful business benefits.
Next gen security for virtualised datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.