Feeds

No Apple TV this year: Media moguls still won't cough up content

Why won't you give us your revenue stream?

SANS - Survey on application security programs

Media execs unwilling to sign a deal with the suits at Cupertino HQ have scotched hopes for an Apple TV in 2012, Bloomberg reports. Wrangles for control in such areas as the user interface have kicked Apple's TV plans into the long grass, and we won't see a TV of any sort in Apple's 12 September reveal, according to the site.

Despite months of rumours about the Apple TV's hardware, it's the legal side Apple is still grappling with. Apple reportedly wants an on-demand TV service – a simple set-top box that would let users watch the shows live or recorded from an archive.

The negotiations with media companies and cable providers have been going on for years, at least since 2007 when the first Apple TV box was released. A CBS exec recounted a few months ago how 2011 negotiations floundered after Steve Jobs started yelling at him.

While the cable companies are generally suspicious of Apple's plans for control, and fear losing their link to their customers, it was arguments over who gets to design the user interface – which includes ways in which the viewer might access other content supplied by the media companies – that scotched this particular round of talks, according to Bloomberg.

There is also friction over who would sell the device: whether it would be available through the cable networks as part of a customer's subscription, or whether it would be on sale from Apple directly, thus cutting out the cable firms. Of the big media firms, Time Warner is said to be the most receptive to Apple's negotiations, but it is unlikely that Apple will introduce a new product if there is no comprehensive deal.

For Apple the importance of the content in a TV device is a no-brainer. Steve Jobs' negotiations with music labels over the iPod was what made the device the runaway success. Cable companies are just proving harder to negotiate with. ®

3 Big data security analytics techniques

More from The Register

next story
Dropbox defends fantastically badly timed Condoleezza Rice appointment
'Nothing is going to change with Dr. Rice's appointment,' file sharer promises
Audio fans, prepare yourself for the Second Coming ... of Blu-ray
High Fidelity Pure Audio – is this what your ears have been waiting for?
MtGox chief Karpelès refuses to come to US for g-men's grilling
Bitcoin baron says he needs another lawyer for FinCEN chat
Record labels sue Pandora over vintage song royalties
Companies want payout on recordings made before 1972
Ex–Apple CEO John Sculley: Ousting Steve Jobs 'was a mistake'
Twenty-nine years later, post-Pepsi exec has flat-forehead moment
Zucker punched: Google gobbles Facebook-wooed Titan Aerospace
Up, up and away in my beautiful balloon flying broadband-bot
Apple DOMINATES the Valley, rakes in more profit than Google, HP, Intel, Cisco COMBINED
Cook & Co. also pay more taxes than those four worthies PLUS eBay and Oracle
prev story

Whitepapers

Securing web applications made simple and scalable
In this whitepaper learn how automated security testing can provide a simple and scalable way to protect your web applications.
3 Big data security analytics techniques
Applying these Big Data security analytics techniques can help you make your business safer by detecting attacks early, before significant damage is done.
The benefits of software based PBX
Why you should break free from your proprietary PBX and how to leverage your existing server hardware.
Top three mobile application threats
Learn about three of the top mobile application security threats facing businesses today and recommendations on how to mitigate the risk.
Combat fraud and increase customer satisfaction
Based on their experience using HP ArcSight Enterprise Security Manager for IT security operations, Finansbank moved to HP ArcSight ESM for fraud management.