Feeds

Dell makes unexpected grab for the PAYG storage cloud

Using Nirvanix cloud storage service

Protecting against web application threats using SSL

Dell quietly released an announcement a few days ago that it was offering a cloud storage service in partnership with Nirvanix. There was no press release, neither from Dell nor Nirvanix, no video, no PR blast, no nothing, just a single tweet, which was promptly retweeted by Nirvanix.

The tweet came from DellServices and read:

Dell Cloud Storage with Nirvanix — Public Storage http://www.onlywire.com/r/100113920

The expanded URL redirects to a Dell webpage entitled Dell Cloud Storage with Nirvanix - Public Storage and from which a PDF can be downloaded.

The PDF is a formal Service Description with this introductory sentence:

Dell Cloud Storage with Nirvanix – Public Service (the “Service”) is a public, multi-tenant STorage as a Service (STaaS) offering designed to enable the integration of internet accessible storage into third party storage processes.

Nirvanix, which offers a Storage Delivery Network cloud, is headed by Scott Genereux who took charge in May last year and is driving the start-up hard.

For example, IBM is OEM'ing the Nirvanix storage service, and now Dell is reselling it. Neither company would want their customers to cease buying storage arrays and transfer previous upfront capital expenditure to pay-as-you-use storage in the cloud but, if some customer early adopters are going to do it anyway, it makes sense to dip a toe into the water and gain experience. That probably explains Dell's low-volume approach to this.

No mainstream storage array vendor has a significant cloud storage effort, not EMC, nor NetApp nor anyone else, although HP does have a cloud service, including a cloud object storage aspect, in beta test. Google, Microsoft with Azure and Amazon – with S3 and now Glacier – are probably the largest players and the trio are, practically speaking, unbuyable. Quantum has just announced a cloud storage initiative but it's too soon to say how popular that will be, and nobody will buy a day one start-up service.

But Nirvanix could be bought if the idea takes off, and it would be far less expensive than buying Amazon.

It looks to be a smart move by Dell, with interesting possibilities for its arrays to treat the Nirvanix cloud as another tier of storage if Dell wished to play that game, as well as offering a straight alternative to its arrays for customers set on storing primary as well as secondary data in the cloud. We're entering a cloud-grab era and the Dell and IBM moves could force other vendors to up their cloud storage ante as well. ®

Choosing a cloud hosting partner with confidence

More from The Register

next story
Wanna keep your data for 1,000 YEARS? No? Hard luck, HDS wants you to anyway
Combine Blu-ray and M-DISC and you get this monster
Google+ GOING, GOING ... ? Newbie Gmailers no longer forced into mandatory ID slurp
Mountain View distances itself from lame 'network thingy'
US boffins demo 'twisted radio' mux
OAM takes wireless signals to 32 Gbps
Apple flops out 2FA for iCloud in bid to stop future nude selfie leaks
Millions of 4chan users howl with laughter as Cupertino slams stable door
Students playing with impressive racks? Yes, it's cluster comp time
The most comprehensive coverage the world has ever seen. Ever
Run little spreadsheet, run! IBM's Watson is coming to gobble you up
Big Blue's big super's big appetite for big data in big clouds for big analytics
Seagate's triple-headed Cerberus could SAVE the DISK WORLD
... and possibly bring us even more HAMR time. Yay!
prev story

Whitepapers

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops
Balancing user privacy and privileged access, in accordance with compliance frameworks and legislation. Evaluating any potential remote control choice.
WIN a very cool portable ZX Spectrum
Win a one-off portable Spectrum built by legendary hardware hacker Ben Heck
Storage capacity and performance optimization at Mizuno USA
Mizuno USA turn to Tegile storage technology to solve both their SAN and backup issues.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
The next step in data security
With recent increased privacy concerns and computers becoming more powerful, the chance of hackers being able to crack smaller-sized RSA keys increases.