Feeds

Google/Oracle judge loses interest in paid bloggers

Letter of the law more important

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

Application security programs and practises

In a surprise move, the judge overseeing the court battle between Google and Oracle over Java patents used in Android has pulled his order that the parties provide a list of bloggers or journalists paid to promote their respective wares.

Last April, Florian Mueller, author of the FOSS Patents blog, outed himself as a paid consultant for Oracle. Mueller's blog has often found merit in Oracle's approach to the issues.

Oracle argued that Google's contributions to the wider intellectual property debate, sometimes through “soft” contributions to trade associations and lobbyists, meant that it influenced public discourse. Those efforts, Oracle argued, made it tougher for it to get a fair hearing. Judge Alsup, who is hearing the case, liked that argument enough to order both parties to disclose anyone in their pay whose contribution to debate or evidence could reveal a conflict of interest.

Verifying that cash flowed between Google and such organisations turned out to be easy, as the text ad giant filed a list of all the organisations it has supported whose opinions could inform the case.

Evidence offered by Oracle suggested that the presence of the Computer & Communications Industry Association on Google's list was especially telling. But Google's own list was arguably worse.

Java creator James Gosling, for example, is on the list of folks it funds in one way or another.

Alsup, however, seems to have decided that whether or not the litigants were sending cash to commentators was irrelevant, and declared their collected works didn't influence his decisions anyway.

Victory in the case therefore remains Google's, with Alsup saying Oracle overreached with its claims and didn't even defend its intellectual property until it became clear some of its patents were being struck out in other legal actions.

A further round of court action in the case seems likely. Which is a capital idea, for lawyers at least. ®

Designing a Defense for Mobile Applications

More from The Register

next story
You! Pirate! Stop pirating, or we shall admonish you politely. Repeatedly, if necessary
And we shall go about telling people you smell. No, not really
Sit back down, Julian Assange™, you're not going anywhere just yet
Swedish court refuses to withdraw arrest warrant
UK Parliament rubber-stamps EMERGENCY data grab 'n' keep bill
Just 49 MPs oppose Drip's rushed timetable
MPs wave through Blighty's 'EMERGENCY' surveillance laws
Only 49 politcos voted against DRIP bill
EU's top data cops to meet Google, Microsoft et al over 'right to be forgotten'
Plan to hammer out 'coherent' guidelines. Good luck chaps!
US judge: YES, cops or feds so can slurp an ENTIRE Gmail account
Crooks don't have folders labelled 'drug records', opines NY beak
Delaware pair nabbed for getting saucy atop Mexican eatery
Burrito meets soft taco in alleged rooftop romp outrage
LightSquared backer sues FCC over spectrum shindy
Why, we might as well have been buying AIR
prev story

Whitepapers

Top three mobile application threats
Prevent sensitive data leakage over insecure channels or stolen mobile devices.
The Essential Guide to IT Transformation
ServiceNow discusses three IT transformations that can help CIO's automate IT services to transform IT and the enterprise.
Mobile application security vulnerability report
The alarming realities regarding the sheer number of applications vulnerable to attack, and the most common and easily addressable vulnerability errors.
How modern custom applications can spur business growth
Learn how to create, deploy and manage custom applications without consuming or expanding the need for scarce, expensive IT resources.
Consolidation: the foundation for IT and business transformation
In this whitepaper learn how effective consolidation of IT and business resources can enable multiple, meaningful business benefits.