Feeds

Another trans-Pac fibre mooted

South Pacific Island Networks redux

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

With wannabe pacific Pacific Fibre out of cash out of the game, a new group has re-emerged with a proposal to string a cable from from Australia and New Zealand to Hawaii, taking in a group of Pacific Islands along the way, rather than following the direct-to-US route proposed by the defunct Pacific Fibre.

The proposal for the Hawaiki Cable emerged during the Pacific Islands Forum, as reported by Scoop on August 30.

Hawaiki Cable's proposed route...

...recalls the SPIN cable first proposed in 2007

“In the works for about three years, the project has been unpublicised, but its designers are going public following the bankrupting of the Pacific Fibre project three weeks ago,” that report states.

The project bears an uncanny resemblance to an older proposal, the South Pacific Islands Network (SPIN). Not only does the Hawaiki proposal take in the same island nations as SPIN (with the addition of Australia and Hawaii), it also shares at least three executives with the 2007 proposal: SPIN’s CEO Rémi Galasso (CEO of Hawaiki), sales director Ludovic Hutier (sales director at SPIN), and CTO Virginie Frouin (also CTO of SPIN).

SPIN reportedly signed its build contract with Alcatel-Lucent in July 2009. Had it gone ahead, SPIN would have been in operation in 2011. According to Communications Day, finances killed the SPIN proposal, although sketchy French-language reports from 2010 refer to tension over the cable in New Caledonia after the election of the government led by Philippe Gomes.

The SPIN-redux proposes a design capacity of 8 Tbps, and if built would use optical add-drop multiplexer branching units to let it hand off lightwaves to destinations without pulling the whole cable to each landing point.

Hawaiki proposes terminations at Sydney, Auckland and Hawaii, with branching units that would support drop-offs at Norfolk Island, New Caledonia, Vanuatu, Fiji, Wallis, Samoa and American Samoa. ®

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

More from The Register

next story
Brit telcos warn Scots that voting Yes could lead to HEFTY bills
BT and Co: Independence vote likely to mean 'increased costs'
Phones 4u slips into administration after EE cuts ties with Brit mobe retailer
More than 5,500 jobs could be axed if rescue mission fails
New 'Cosmos' browser surfs the net by TXT alone
No data plan? No WiFi? No worries ... except sluggish download speed
Radio hams can encrypt, in emergencies, says Ofcom
Consultation promises new spectrum and hints at relaxed licence conditions
Blockbuster book lays out the first 20 years of the Smartphone Wars
Symbian's David Wood bares all. Not for the faint hearted
'Serious flaws in the Vertigan report' says broadband boffin
Report 'fails reality test' , is 'simply wrong' and offers ''convenient' justification for FTTN says Rod Tucker
This flashlight app requires: Your contacts list, identity, access to your camera...
Who us, dodgy? Vast majority of mobile apps fail privacy test
prev story

Whitepapers

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops
Balancing user privacy and privileged access, in accordance with compliance frameworks and legislation. Evaluating any potential remote control choice.
Saudi Petroleum chooses Tegile storage solution
A storage solution that addresses company growth and performance for business-critical applications of caseware archive and search along with other key operational systems.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.
Providing a secure and efficient Helpdesk
A single remote control platform for user support is be key to providing an efficient helpdesk. Retain full control over the way in which screen and keystroke data is transmitted.