Feeds

'This lawsuit is not about patents or money, it's about values'

Plus: 'A mind-numblingly inept display'

High performance access to file storage

Quotw This was the week when analysts, pundits, beancounters and opinion-holders of all stripes got to have their say on the Apple v Samsung patent verdict going the fruity firm's way.

While Apple pushed hard to get Samsung mobes pulled from the shelves as soon as humanly possible, the Korean chaebol vowed to fight on and passed some snide remarks about the iDevice-maker:

History has shown there has yet to be a company that has won the hearts and minds of consumers and achieved continuous growth, when its primary means to competition has been the outright abuse of patent law, not the pursuit of innovation.

Apple listed eight phones, including four US iterations of the Galaxy SII, that it reckoned should get temporarily banned now while it waits for the court to permanently put a stop to around 29 Sammy products coming into the US:

Apple reserves all rights regarding a permanent injunction, but has tailored this list to address a portion of the immediate, ongoing irreparable harm that Apple is suffering.

Aw, diddums! It's tough being one of the top tech companies in the world with monster piles of cash, isn't it? As Reg hack Iain Thompson wondered:

Apple is now the most valuable company on the planet (in part thanks to the declining value of the American dollar), dominates the tablet market, and has the high-end of the smartphone sector locked down. It has also got the most lucrative apps market and reaps 30 per cent on everything sold. Is this not enough?

But apparently it's not. Apple wants to take all its money and ship it on up to the moral high ground, as Tim Cook's memo to staff seems to suggest that's where the firm is after the verdict. He said:

For us this lawsuit has always been about something much more important than patents or money. It’s about values. We value originality and innovation and pour our lives into making the best products on earth. And we do this to delight our customers, not for competitors to flagrantly copy.

Many others, including Nodeable's Matt Asay, writing for The Reg, said: "Don't you remember the many times Silicon Valley, and indeed Apple itself, has innovated off each other's backs?" Asay pointed out:

Silicon Valley went decades without the aggressive litigiousness crippling it the way patent suits are now hobbling the mobile industry. This is the place that thrived in the absence of non-competes and other restrictions on competition and innovation. It has been a very competitive industry, but not one prone to patent lawsuits, including for significant examples of copying, like when Apple ripped off Xerox Parc.

Legal pundits were also busily questioning the speed of the jury's verdict, which was reckoned to be a bit unusual given the complex nature of patent law. Litigator Elie Mystal wrote on legal blog Above the Law:

Here’s the thing, ladies and gentlemen of the Apple v Samsung jury: It would take me more than three days to understand all the terms in the verdict! Much less come to a legally binding decision on all of these separate issues. Did you guys just flip a coin?

In other legal squabbles, Julian Assange is still holed up in the Ecuadorian embassy and has none other than the country's president Rafael Correra fighting his corner. And what a fight it is. First off, Correra talks of Britain's "grave diplomatic error" in apparently threatening to enter the embassy.

He went on to say that it didn't really matter anyway because Assange didn't really do anything that wrong and anyway Britain can't talk because this is like the time it refused to extradite former Chilean dictator Augusto Pinochet after his 1998 arrest in London:

The crimes that Assange is accused of, they would not be crimes in 90 to 95 per cent of the planet.

Britain supported Augusto Pinochet unconditionally. And they let him go, they didn't extradite him on humanitarian grounds, whereas they want to extradite Julian Assange for not using a condom, for the love of God.

A British police officer mistakenly revealed a briefing note that instructed coppers to arrest Assange "under all circumstances", carrying it in his hands outside the embassy where a news photographer snapped it.

If Assange leaves the embassy with a diplomat or in a diplomatic bag (which can be anything up to a shipping container), the police should pounce.

And finally, O2 ran into trouble with customers when it failed to muster a speedy enough recovery from a sliced undersea cable.

While BSkyB and BT were able to get back on their feet in relatively short order, O2 kept its users waiting, and waiting, and waiting. Which they naturally reacted really well about on O2's forums. One snarked:

Almost 30 hours to get so much as any acknowledgement on any of the O2 status pages. A mind-numbingly inept display by O2. ®

3 Big data security analytics techniques

More from The Register

next story
Did a date calculation bug just cost hard-up Co-op Bank £110m?
And just when Brit banking org needs £400m to stay afloat
One year on: diplomatic fail as Chinese APT gangs get back to work
Mandiant says past 12 months shows Beijing won't call off its hackers
Whoever you vote for, Google gets in
Report uncovers giant octopus squid of lobbying influence
Lavabit loses contempt of court appeal over protecting Snowden, customers
Judges rule complaints about government power are too little, too late
MtGox chief Karpelès refuses to come to US for g-men's grilling
Bitcoin baron says he needs another lawyer for FinCEN chat
Don't let no-hire pact suit witnesses call Steve Jobs a bullyboy, plead Apple and Google
'Irrelevant' character evidence should be excluded – lawyers
EFF: Feds plan to put 52 MILLION FACES into recognition database
System would identify faces as part of biometrics collection
Putin tells Snowden: Russia conducts no US-style mass surveillance
Gov't is too broke for that, Russian prez says
Ex-Tony Blair adviser is new top boss at UK spy-hive GCHQ
Robert Hannigan to replace Sir Iain Lobban in the autumn
Alphadex fires back at British Gas with overcharging allegation
Brit colo outfit says it paid for 347KVA, has been charged for 1940KVA
prev story

Whitepapers

Top three mobile application threats
Learn about three of the top mobile application security threats facing businesses today and recommendations on how to mitigate the risk.
Combat fraud and increase customer satisfaction
Based on their experience using HP ArcSight Enterprise Security Manager for IT security operations, Finansbank moved to HP ArcSight ESM for fraud management.
The benefits of software based PBX
Why you should break free from your proprietary PBX and how to leverage your existing server hardware.
Five 3D headsets to be won!
We were so impressed by the Durovis Dive headset we’ve asked the company to give some away to Reg readers.
SANS - Survey on application security programs
In this whitepaper learn about the state of application security programs and practices of 488 surveyed respondents, and discover how mature and effective these programs are.