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VMware bounced from the OpenStack party

What do you mean we're not on the list?

VMware’s admission to the OpenStack open-source cloud party has been kicked back.

The inaugural board meeting of the new OpenStack delayed its decision on letting VMware join as a gold-level member because of time pressure, according to a report.

OpenStack executive chairman Jonathan Bryce reportedly told the Linux Foundation’s CloudOpen conference: "They [the applications] were last on the agenda and there was no time left to review them.”

NEC and Intel were also up for membership at gold level – a decision on their applications has also been bumped to a later date.

What could have delayed the decision? Among other things, it seems, the appointment of new senior executives.

SuSE director of industry initiatives, emerging standards and open source Alan Clark was named OpenStack chairman and Sun Microsystems' former cloud chief turned Cisco chief technology officer for cloud, Lew Tucker, was picked as vice president.

The OpenStack board had held its first board meeting since the ratification of a new structure in San Diego, California.

OpenStack was spun up in 2010 as a Linux-for-the-cloud, an attempt to create a core kernel that anybody can contribute to and use under a permissive licence, one which is not owned by a single company.

It was intended, in part, as an alternative to the closed VMware hypervisor.

Today, while OpenStack works on vSphere, the group says most development is done using KVM and XEN.

With the hypervisor market saturated and competition coming from Microsoft, VMware will be keen to ensure its other APIs work with OpenStack, while those in the OpenStack ecosystem see an opportunity to work with the VMware APIs on its Cloud Foundry. ®

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