Feeds

Samsung whips out Galaxy Note II, cam-phone with proper zoom lens

YES! I AM TAKING A PICTURE!

Security for virtualized datacentres

IFA 2012 After Samsung officially unveiled the Galaxy Note II at IFA this week, attentions turned to its all-new camera phone, a digital snapper with built-in 3G connectivity.

The South Korean firm's latest push into the photography domain introduces the Galaxy Camera with its 16.3Mp sensor, 21x optical zoom and practically every type of connectivity under the sun.

Two models are available - a 3G and Wi-Fi, or a 4G and Wi-Fi - both with 1.4GHz processors, 8GB of internal storage and an Android 4.1 Jelly Bean OS.

Samsung Galaxy Camera

The Galaxy Camera's various edit and share settings are navigated through a 4.8in 308ppi touchscreen, which covers the entire back panel, mimicking the appearance of a smartphone or miniature tablet device.

Of course, from the front, it looks like your average point-and-shoot - albeit slightly on the large side - with a pop-out flash and f/2.8 lens.

We've seen a new wave of cameraphones lately, with both Polaroid and Nikon's Android-based snappers, but this appears to be the first model to sport 3G connectivity. While there's no support for GSM voice communication, users can upload images, access the web and make VoIP calls.

How convenient the Galaxy Camera is for such use remains to be seen, but with the size of our connected devices ever increasing, the Galaxy Camera's dimensions shouldn't be an issue.

After all, the Galaxy Note II - officially revealed by Samsung earlier - boasts a whopping 5.5in 720p display. The handset is actually thinner than the company's Galaxy S III, but with the dedicated S-Pen and a body that bridges the gap between tablets and phones, it's clear Sammy sees bigger blowers as something consumers crave.

Samsung Galaxy Note II

The Samsung Galaxy Note II runs on a quad-core 1.6GHz processor with 2GB of Ram, powers Android 4.1 Jelly Bean and comes in 16GB, 32GB and 64GB versions. There's also 8Mp rear-facing and 1.9Mp front-facing cameras, Bluetooth 4.0, NFC capabilities and a large 3100mAh battery.

Prices for either device have yet to be set, but the Galaxy Note II will launch in Europe this October, while the Samsung Galaxy Camera is expected later this year. Snappy days. ®

Protecting users from Firesheep and other Sidejacking attacks with SSL

More from The Register

next story
Oi, Tim Cook. Apple Watch. I DARE you to tell me, IN PERSON, that it's secure
State attorney demands Apple CEO bows the knee to him
Phones 4u website DIES as wounded mobe retailer struggles to stay above water
Founder blames 'ruthless network partners' for implosion
Monitors monitor's monitoring finds touch screens have 0.4% market share
Not four. Point four. Count yer booty again, Microsoft
Getting to the BOTTOM of the great office seating debate
Belay that toil, me hearty, and park your scurvy backside
Hey, Mac fanbois. HGST wants you drooling over its HUGE desktop RACK
What vast digital media repository could possibly need 64 TERABYTES?
In a spin: Samsung accuses LG exec of washing machine SABOTAGE
Rival electronic giant tries to iron out allegations
Lumia rebrand begins: Nokia's new UK web home is Microsoft.com
Yarr, them Nokia logos walking the plank and into the drink
prev story

Whitepapers

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops
Balancing user privacy and privileged access, in accordance with compliance frameworks and legislation. Evaluating any potential remote control choice.
WIN a very cool portable ZX Spectrum
Win a one-off portable Spectrum built by legendary hardware hacker Ben Heck
Storage capacity and performance optimization at Mizuno USA
Mizuno USA turn to Tegile storage technology to solve both their SAN and backup issues.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
The next step in data security
With recent increased privacy concerns and computers becoming more powerful, the chance of hackers being able to crack smaller-sized RSA keys increases.