Feeds

Radio arse tags solve modern-day TV musical chairs dilemma

There's no such thing as over-engineering

Beginner's guide to SSL certificates

Vid Little electronic tags that broadcast data over the air turn up in the strangest of places. Now they've managed to end up sewn into the back of contestants' shorts in a TV version of childhood favourite, musical chairs.

The programme is called Oh Sit! and made by US broadcaster CBS. It adds live music and an obstacle course to the staple of kiddie parties - and, most interestingly, relies on RFID tags sewn into players' clothes that communicate via radio wave to receivers stuck to the chairs. They replace the parental intervention normally necessary when two children contestants dive for the same seat.

Here's how it's supposed to work:

RFID Journal has a lot more details, including the models of reader and tag selected, but the critical challenge is to keep the amount of metal in the seats at a low. Running wires directly to the freely revolving chairs, and real-time tracking of the contestants as they run about and circle the course, isn't practical.

Accurate indoor tracking is puzzling some of the best tech companies at the moment, but the other issues raised by the TV game were resolved with a slip-ring antenna to reduce the amount of cabling from the chairs, and carefully tuned tag readers resting on foam pads to mitigate the metal construction.

That results in the first arse in place trigging the chair, which transmits the player's ID to the game server over Wi-Fi, even if the contestant is later shoved aside as they so often are in the children's party original. ®

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

More from The Register

next story
Sea-Me-We 5 construction starts
New sub cable to go live 2016
Vodafone to buy 140 Phones 4u stores from stricken retailer
887 jobs 'preserved' in the process, says administrator PwC
BT claims almost-gigabit connections over COPPER WIRE
Just need to bring the fibre box within 19m ...
EE coughs to BROKEN data usage metrics BLUNDER that short-changes customers
Carrier apologises for 'inflated' measurements cockup
Comcast: Help, help, FCC. Netflix and pals are EXTORTIONISTS
The others guys are being mean so therefore ... monopoly all good, yeah?
Surprise: if you work from home you need the Internet
Buffer-rage sends Aussies out to experience road rage
EE buys 58 Phones 4u stores for £2.5m after picking over carcass
Operator says it will safeguard 359 jobs, plans lick of paint
prev story

Whitepapers

Providing a secure and efficient Helpdesk
A single remote control platform for user support is be key to providing an efficient helpdesk. Retain full control over the way in which screen and keystroke data is transmitted.
Intelligent flash storage arrays
Tegile Intelligent Storage Arrays with IntelliFlash helps IT boost storage utilization and effciency while delivering unmatched storage savings and performance.
Beginner's guide to SSL certificates
De-mystify the technology involved and give you the information you need to make the best decision when considering your online security options.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.
Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops
Balancing user privacy and privileged access, in accordance with compliance frameworks and legislation. Evaluating any potential remote control choice.