Feeds

ACMA flags more ‘agile’ regulatory future

Fleet feet needed in converged world

Securing Web Applications Made Simple and Scalable

The days of “black letter law” regulation are numbered, according to ACMA chairman and CEO Chris Chapman, with technology changing and converging faster than legislation can keep up.

Delivering the ACS / Telecommunications Society Charles Todd Oration yesterday, Chapman said the fast-moving telecommunications environment demands an “ongoing reassessment of when regulation is required”, and that the future will require “regulation that is fit for purpose” and a “vastly more agile ACMA”.

Recognising that such a stance places the regulator at risk of finding itself in the same kind of lawyerly leg-roping that often immobilizes the FCC in America, Chapman said the future demands a “top-down philosophical reassessment of the way in which legislation … regulatory instruments and intervention is accomplished.”

The ACMA’s ability to respond to regulatory demands demand that both consumers and regulated industries have trust in their regulatory body – and in particular, “that regulation will be free from any government and political interference”.

Perhaps in light of that need for independence, Chapman told the audience he was “a little gobsmacked” at the suggestion, from the government’s Convergence Review, that ACMA be abolished and replaced with a new super-regulator.

The review, he said, “only touched on 40 percent of ACMA activities” (presumably, those particularly associated with its broadcasting responsibilities and ignoring its telecommunications and radio spectrum responsibilities).

Describing just how much the telecommunications landscape now differs from that when Australia’s “decades old” legislation was first framed, he noted that voice services were no longer associated with a voice line, but had become apps: “the vendor of the voice app can easily be substituted with another.”

The IP networking world is also challenging government sovereignty, sometimes in ways that citizens don’t fully realize: “the data held outside government now far exceeds that held by government.” ®

The smart choice: opportunity from uncertainty

More from The Register

next story
Yorkshire cops fail to grasp principle behind BT Fon Wi-Fi network
'Prevent people that are passing by to hook up to your network', pleads plod
UK government officially adopts Open Document Format
Microsoft insurgency fails, earns snarky remark from UK digital services head
Major problems beset UK ISP filth filters: But it's OK, nobody uses them
It's almost as though pr0n was actually rather popular
HP, Microsoft prove it again: Big Business doesn't create jobs
SMEs get lip service - what they need is dinner at the Club
ITC: Seagate and LSI can infringe Realtek patents because Realtek isn't in the US
Land of the (get off scot) free, when it's a foreign owner
MPs wave through Blighty's 'EMERGENCY' surveillance laws
Only 49 politcos voted against DRIP bill
Help yourself to anyone's photos FOR FREE, suggests UK.gov
Copyright law reforms will keep m'learned friends busy
prev story

Whitepapers

Designing a Defense for Mobile Applications
Learn about the various considerations for defending mobile applications - from the application architecture itself to the myriad testing technologies.
How modern custom applications can spur business growth
Learn how to create, deploy and manage custom applications without consuming or expanding the need for scarce, expensive IT resources.
Reducing security risks from open source software
Follow a few strategies and your organization can gain the full benefits of open source and the cloud without compromising the security of your applications.
Boost IT visibility and business value
How building a great service catalog relieves pressure points and demonstrates the value of IT service management.
Consolidation: the foundation for IT and business transformation
In this whitepaper learn how effective consolidation of IT and business resources can enable multiple, meaningful business benefits.