Feeds

ACMA flags more ‘agile’ regulatory future

Fleet feet needed in converged world

Application security programs and practises

The days of “black letter law” regulation are numbered, according to ACMA chairman and CEO Chris Chapman, with technology changing and converging faster than legislation can keep up.

Delivering the ACS / Telecommunications Society Charles Todd Oration yesterday, Chapman said the fast-moving telecommunications environment demands an “ongoing reassessment of when regulation is required”, and that the future will require “regulation that is fit for purpose” and a “vastly more agile ACMA”.

Recognising that such a stance places the regulator at risk of finding itself in the same kind of lawyerly leg-roping that often immobilizes the FCC in America, Chapman said the future demands a “top-down philosophical reassessment of the way in which legislation … regulatory instruments and intervention is accomplished.”

The ACMA’s ability to respond to regulatory demands demand that both consumers and regulated industries have trust in their regulatory body – and in particular, “that regulation will be free from any government and political interference”.

Perhaps in light of that need for independence, Chapman told the audience he was “a little gobsmacked” at the suggestion, from the government’s Convergence Review, that ACMA be abolished and replaced with a new super-regulator.

The review, he said, “only touched on 40 percent of ACMA activities” (presumably, those particularly associated with its broadcasting responsibilities and ignoring its telecommunications and radio spectrum responsibilities).

Describing just how much the telecommunications landscape now differs from that when Australia’s “decades old” legislation was first framed, he noted that voice services were no longer associated with a voice line, but had become apps: “the vendor of the voice app can easily be substituted with another.”

The IP networking world is also challenging government sovereignty, sometimes in ways that citizens don’t fully realize: “the data held outside government now far exceeds that held by government.” ®

Designing a Defense for Mobile Applications

More from The Register

next story
Sit back down, Julian Assange™, you're not going anywhere just yet
Swedish court refuses to withdraw arrest warrant
UK Parliament rubber-stamps EMERGENCY data grab 'n' keep bill
Just 49 MPs oppose Drip's rushed timetable
MPs wave through Blighty's 'EMERGENCY' surveillance laws
Only 49 politcos voted against DRIP bill
EU's top data cops to meet Google, Microsoft et al over 'right to be forgotten'
Plan to hammer out 'coherent' guidelines. Good luck chaps!
Delaware pair nabbed for getting saucy atop Mexican eatery
Burrito meets soft taco in alleged rooftop romp outrage
British cops cuff 660 suspected paedophiles
Arrests people allegedly accessing child abuse images online
LightSquared backer sues FCC over spectrum shindy
Why, we might as well have been buying AIR
prev story

Whitepapers

Top three mobile application threats
Prevent sensitive data leakage over insecure channels or stolen mobile devices.
The Essential Guide to IT Transformation
ServiceNow discusses three IT transformations that can help CIO's automate IT services to transform IT and the enterprise.
Mobile application security vulnerability report
The alarming realities regarding the sheer number of applications vulnerable to attack, and the most common and easily addressable vulnerability errors.
How modern custom applications can spur business growth
Learn how to create, deploy and manage custom applications without consuming or expanding the need for scarce, expensive IT resources.
Consolidation: the foundation for IT and business transformation
In this whitepaper learn how effective consolidation of IT and business resources can enable multiple, meaningful business benefits.