Feeds

Ten movies inspired by video games

Playing in the cinema

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

Tomb Raider (2001)

RH Numbers

The Tomb Raider movie makes plenty of references to moments in the Eidos classic. Yet in keeping with the game-movie tradition of being pretty dire, it also raises the bar with reasonably exciting action scenes and moments of bouncy brilliance. It's no Indiana Jones, but for a mindless film full of special effects, Tomb Raider ticks plenty of boxes.

Angelina Jolie was perfect for the portrayal of the sexiest video game character of all time too. Can you imagine anyone else playing Ms. Croft so well?

This genre of game is probably one of the best for adaptation and gives plenty of scope for action, exploration and mysticism. I would say it was unfortunate that Sony's plans for an Uncharted film continue to stall. Apparently, the writers of Disney's National Treasure are the latest in the the frame for penning duties. Still, let's not kid ourselves on the likelihood of it being a complete flop. I do want more Nathan Drake, but let's keep him tied to the PlayStation for now, at least.

Tomb Raider

Uwe BollUwe BollUwe BollBoll-buster Rating 50%
More info IMDB

Uwe Boll movies

RH Numbers

The infamous director has such an affinity for making films based on video games, that we decided to give him his own section in the roundup here. Of course, the dubious director is hardly regarded with much esteem in both gaming and movie-making communities, as almost all of his movies have flopped big time.

Titles such as Bloodrayne, Dungeon Siege and Alone in the Dark all turned out to be spectacular failures, financially. Furthermore, his attempts at making Far Cry and Postal adaptations took the biscuit. The former cost a reported $30m to produce and couldn't even scrape $800,000 in the Box Office, while Postal – which cost $15m to make – barely recovered $150k. Ouch.

With such bad form, it's little surprise Blizzard laughed away Boll's approach to direct the upcoming World of Warcraft film. "We will not sell the movie rights, not to you – especially not to you," was the company's line.

Well, as they say, if at first you don't succeed, try, try, try again. Unless you're Uwe Boll, of course, who by now should probably consider leaving the video game-to-movie market well alone. ®

Postal

Uwe BollUwe BollUwe BollUwe BollUwe BollBoll-buster Rating 100%
More info IMDB

The essential guide to IT transformation

More from The Register

next story
So, Apple won't sell cheap kit? Prepare the iOS garden wall WRECKING BALL
It can throw the low cost race if it looks to the cloud
Samsung Gear S: Quick, LAUNCH IT – before Apple straps on iWatch
Full specs for wrist-mounted device here ... but who'll buy it?
Apple promises to lift Curse of the Drained iPhone 5 Battery
Have you tried turning it off and...? Never mind, here's a replacement
Now that's FIRE WIRE: HP recalls 6 MILLION burn-risk laptop cables
Right in the middle of Burning Mains Man week
HUGE iPAD? Maybe. HUGE ADVERTS? That's for SURE
Noo! Hand not big enough! Don't look at meee!
AMD unveils 'single purpose' graphics card for PC gamers and NO ONE else
Chip maker claims the Radeon R9 285 is 'best in its class'
prev story

Whitepapers

5 things you didn’t know about cloud backup
IT departments are embracing cloud backup, but there’s a lot you need to know before choosing a service provider. Learn all the critical things you need to know.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Backing up Big Data
Solving backup challenges and “protect everything from everywhere,” as we move into the era of big data management and the adoption of BYOD.
Consolidation: The Foundation for IT Business Transformation
In this whitepaper learn how effective consolidation of IT and business resources can enable multiple, meaningful business benefits.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?