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T-Mobile Vivacity

RH Numbers
RH Recommended Medal

In essence, the Vivacity is almost identical to Orange's aforementioned San Francisco II. Both are produced by ZTE and upon close inspection, there's little difference between them beyond the fact the Vivacity looks more like an iPhone. I'm staggered that a crack team from Cupertino hasn't come a knocking yet.

As with The San Fran II, the Vivacity's main selling point is its 3.5in display. With a resolution of 480 x 800 and 267ppi it's quite impressive to behold. It also relies on an S1 800MHz processor from a couple years back. Alas, the handset is let down by a glossy fingerprint magnet casing, but does at least bring 802.11n to its Wi-Fi roster.

The Vivacity is a decent all-rounder and, as budget smartphones go, certainly worthy of a look-in, so long as you don't mind being locked-in with Orange, of course.

T-Mobile Vivacity

Reg Rating 85%
Price £89
More info T-Mobile

Vodafone Smart II

RH Numbers

Vodafone's Android offering in the sub-£100 category barely scrapes the average barrel in terms of technical capabilities or design for that matter. OK, so the handset is a handy size and feels fairly comfortable to use, That said, the inclusion of a strange two-piece back panel makes little sense and taking the battery out to reach the Sim or MicroSD card is a fiddly affair.

Broadcom's 830MHz BCM21553 processor makes its second appearance in this roundup and steps things up a notch from the original Smart's 528MHz spec, however, the performance is nothing special, though. For a budget blower, there's the somewhat rare appearance of a dedicated camera button, but the quality is at a below-par 3Mp, so why bother? And while the 3.2in display with its 480 x 320 resolution suggests it should be fine, content viewed on it looked rather washed out. Mehs all round on this one.

Vodafone Smart II

Reg Rating 60%
Price £70
More info Vodafone

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