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NASA: WE'VE FOUND Four-toed NON-HUMAN FOOTPRINTS

'Photos taken on Earth', insists amateur scientist

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US space agency NASA, one of the few organisations with probe craft operating beyond Earth orbit (for instance upon the surface of Mars and above planets and moons still further-flung) has stunned the world by releasing photos of a huge, four-toed footprint dating from more than 100 million years ago.

Footprint at undisclosed location. Credit: NASA

'Huge, armoured creature' left this dinnerplate sized print

In an unusual twist, the space agency refuses to divulge just where in the solar system the massive footprint was found: according to a NASA statement this information is "sensitive", which would naturally lead to speculation that the US government is hushing up information on nonhuman life forms for one of a variety of reasons.

It's always possible that the concern here is to suppress any public panic regarding a possible alien invasion etc, and in this context it's worth noting that the space agency believes the print must have been left by a "large, armoured" creature, describable as "a four-footed tank".

However in more reassuring news it appears that the print is more than 100 million years old, and was made - NASA says - at a time when "the bright, barred spiral galaxy NGC 3259 was just forming stars in dark bands of dust and gas".

NASA is of course well-known in some circles* for having staged the Moon landings of the 1960s and 70s here on Earth for one of a variety of purposes, and in this context it should be noted that a keen amateur scientist, dinosaur expert Ray Stanford, has come forward to insist that in fact the footprint is nothing more than an ordinary terrestrial Cretaceous-era dino print.

Stanford, in fact, says that the footprint - most probably made by a hefty brute known as a nodosaur - is located in the grounds of a large NASA facility, the Goddard Space Flight Centre in Maryland: which would account for the space agency being able to successfully keep its location secret.

Read all about it here. ®

*Mad ones

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