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Everything Everywhere to be Nothing Nowhere in rebrand

Reg readers! Suggest new name for mobile telco NOW

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Everything Everywhere will change its identity before the end of 2012 - but will NOT merge its Orange and T-Mobile brands, which will continue to confuse punters indefinitely.

Orange and T-Mobile are, and will remain, consumer brands for Everything Everywhere, the UK's largest mobile operator. EE will announce a new moniker in the next few months - but given the trouble it had picking a name in the first place, El Reg has offered to lend a hand. We've decided to solicit reader suggestions, and once we've polled for a favourite we'll send it over to EE, just in time for its rebranding launch.

The combined Orange-T-Mobile operation has been known as Everything Everywhere since May 2010, when the name was selected as a placeholder while the newly formed conglomerate congealed into a recognisable entity. At that time we were told there would be no company logo, or public branding, as the name was only temporary while the company considered whether to hang on to Orange and T-Mobile, or build a new banner under which the whole operation could be hung.

But some EE shops did indeed appear, complete with Everything Everywhere branding, and were called "creative concepts in communications retailing". Even before the change of name was announced we were told by an Everything Everywhere representative that they'd be no more stores bearing the EE brand.

Everything Everywhere was always quite a stupid name, not least because the vagaries of mobile technology mean that no operator can provide connectivity "everywhere", or provide access to "everything", making the company's very name an empty promise.

So suggestions should reflect the reality of what a mobile network can achieve, and enable the company to make the most of its newly acquired 4G monopoly. Those of an artistic bent are welcome to try their hands at a logo, text suggestions can be thrown into the comments or mailed over, and we'll pick out the best (within the limits of taste and decency) for a reader poll later in the week. ®

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