Feeds

Windows 7 hotspot hacker turns to software bonding

Wi-Fi, 4G, wired, whatever you've got – borged into one powerful stream

Internet Security Threat Report 2014

The company responsible for hacking a Wi-Fi hotspot into Windows 7 is turning its hand to software bonding, promising tens of megabits over the slowest of cellular connections.

The company has prototype Windows code which can bond multiple IP connections into a single stream, merging multiple Wi-Fi, cellular or physical connections to provide one IP address with serious connectivity, assuming one has the USB ports to spare:

Bonding IP connections together is nothing new, Be will happily glue together multiple ADSL lines for the home user who wants a little more poke, while SharedBand does the same thing across multiple ISPs for those who want reliability as well as speed. But those offerings require special routers and cloud-based aggregators, while Connectify's solution runs on a single PC.

Connectify reckons the software is ideal for bonding the coffee-shop Wi-Fi with a personal (4G?) Hotspot, or multiplying up several slow Wi-Fi connections, though to do that you'll have to have multiple Wi-Fi interface cards obviously. Anyone sitting in an office equipped with both Wi-Fi and wired access will see the utility in being able to load both at the same time, though with 100Mb/sec Ethernet now commonplace one has to question if the addition of Wi-Fi will make a significant difference.

Connectify certainly knows their Windows 7 IP stack, having stumbled across, and successfully exploited, the Wi-Fi hotspot code hidden within the Microsoft OS. That hack is now embodied in the eponymous Connectify Hotspot product, which comes with limited support for Vista and XP and costs $21 for the Pro version (there's a free version too).

Connectify Dispatch, as the company is calling its software bonding product, is currently selling for $40, bundled with Hotspot – despite being little more than a prototype at the moment. The company is hoping that pre-orders, and a Kickstarter page, will raise the money it needs to turn Dispatch into a real product, though a more compelling use case may also be needed to turn it mainstream. ®

Remote control for virtualized desktops

More from The Register

next story
PEAK APPLE: iOS 8 is least popular Cupertino mobile OS in all of HUMAN HISTORY
'Nerd release' finally staggers past 50 per cent adoption
Microsoft to bake Skype into IE, without plugins
Redmond thinks the Object Real-Time Communications API for WebRTC is ready to roll
Microsoft promises Windows 10 will mean two-factor auth for all
Sneak peek at security features Redmond's baking into new OS
Mozilla: Spidermonkey ATE Apple's JavaScriptCore, THRASHED Google V8
Moz man claims the win on rivals' own benchmarks
FTDI yanks chip-bricking driver from Windows Update, vows to fight on
Next driver to battle fake chips with 'non-invasive' methods
DEATH by PowerPoint: Microsoft warns of 0-day attack hidden in slides
Might put out patch in update, might chuck it out sooner
Ubuntu 14.10 tries pulling a Steve Ballmer on cloudy offerings
Oi, Windows, centOS and openSUSE – behave, we're all friends here
Was ist das? Eine neue Suse Linux Enterprise? Ausgezeichnet!
Version 12 first major-number Suse release since 2009
prev story

Whitepapers

Why cloud backup?
Combining the latest advancements in disk-based backup with secure, integrated, cloud technologies offer organizations fast and assured recovery of their critical enterprise data.
Getting started with customer-focused identity management
Learn why identity is a fundamental requirement to digital growth, and how without it there is no way to identify and engage customers in a meaningful way.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
New hybrid storage solutions
Tackling data challenges through emerging hybrid storage solutions that enable optimum database performance whilst managing costs and increasingly large data stores.
Mitigating web security risk with SSL certificates
Web-based systems are essential tools for running business processes and delivering services to customers.