Feeds

Google loads Moto Mobility cannon, fires patent shells at Apple

Siri, is this Mountain View's back-up plan?

Top 5 reasons to deploy VMware with Tegile

Google's Motorola Mobility has filed a fresh patent infringement case against Apple over features on its phones, including the iPhone's voice assistant, Siri.

Moto filed with the US International Trade Commission to try to get Apple's iDevices and Macs banned in the country over seven different patents that deal with location reminders, email notification and video players, among other things.

“We would like to settle these patent matters, but Apple’s unwillingness to work out a licence leaves us little choice but to defend ourselves and our engineers’ innovations,” Motorola Mobility said in a statement to Bloomberg.

The handset-maker already has another complaint open at the ITC against Apple, listing four patents, and an initial ruling decided that the firm was right about one of them. The full commission still has to review the decision however, before iPhones and 3G-enabled iPads get banned in the US. The final determination is expected later this week.

Before Google's acquisition of Motorola, it wasn't meeting its fruity adversary directly, although Apple had been targeting the Chocolate Factory's partners who were using the Android OS on their mobes.

Now Apple and Google are facing off in the existing Moto battles as well as the new one filed with the ITC, which is not yet publicly available.

The US Congress has been mulling over whether or not any companies should be able to get bans on rival products based on standards essential patents (SEP). SEP-holders argue that they should have as much recourse to the law as other patent-owners, but since SEP has to be licensed under fair, reasonable and non-discriminatory (FRAND) terms, potential licensees don't think their gear should be banned if they haven't come to an agreement on those terms.

Moto, like Samsung, has argued that Apple refuses to pay a reasonable licensing fee and is relying on SEP-holders' lack of legal clout to keep avoiding the payments. Apple says that these matters should be sorted out in federal court, not with the ITC, and has claimed that it has only been offered unfair licensing deals.

Motorola in Europe had not returned a request for comment at the time of publication. ®

Internet Security Threat Report 2014

Whitepapers

Designing and building an open ITOA architecture
Learn about a new IT data taxonomy defined by the four data sources of IT visibility: wire, machine, agent, and synthetic data sets.
Why CIOs should rethink endpoint data protection in the age of mobility
Assessing trends in data protection, specifically with respect to mobile devices, BYOD, and remote employees.
Getting started with customer-focused identity management
Learn why identity is a fundamental requirement to digital growth, and how without it there is no way to identify and engage customers in a meaningful way.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
Security and trust: The backbone of doing business over the internet
Explores the current state of website security and the contributions Symantec is making to help organizations protect critical data and build trust with customers.