Feeds

WikiLeaks haters launch DDoS assault on Russia Today

In support of the Pussy Riot 3

SANS - Survey on application security programs

An anti-WikiLeaks group has admitted responsibility for a sustained DDoS attack that made the Russia Today website intermittently unavailable on Friday.

The Kremlin-funded channel features a talk show hosted by Julian Assange but posts by AntiLeaks, the group which launched the attack, suggest the assault has more to do with the controversial guilty verdict in the trial of Russian feminist punk rockers Pussy Riot.

All three members of Pussy Riot were jailed for two years on Friday after they were convicted for singing an anti-Putin song in Moscow's Orthodox Cathedral. They were convicted of "hooliganism motivated by religious hatred".

Russian Today (RT) confirmed a wave of assaults against its main website in a series of Twitter updates (here and here) and in a story on its website.

WikiLeaks condemned the attack on RT as an assault on free speech. "WikiLeaks condemns the attempt to censor RT. RT is an important alternative voice in the West," a tweet by the whistle-blowing group said.

RT's editorial line generally supports both Assange and Russian president Vladimir Putin.

Jeremy Nicholls, channel & business development director at DDoS mitigation specialists Arbor Networks, commented: “The attack against Russia Today highlights how DDoS is increasingly being used as a method of protest by activist groups in order to voice their frustrations.

"Hackers understand the damage they can inflict upon an organisation when they hit them with a DDoS attack, as they essentially shut down their entire business – meaning customers are unable to access their site, causing significant financial and reputational damage.

"It is therefore extremely important that organisations take the threat posed by cyber-criminals seriously. Organisations should not ask themselves if they will be attacked, they should ask themselves when they will be attacked. It is important for organisations to identify where their most critical assets lie within their network and ensure they are comprehensively protected from opportunistic hackers," he added. ®

High performance access to file storage

More from The Register

next story
Obama allows NSA to exploit 0-days: report
If the spooks say they need it, they get it
Putin tells Snowden: Russia conducts no US-style mass surveillance
Gov't is too broke for that, Russian prez says
Snowden-inspired crypto-email service Lavaboom launches
German service pays tribute to Lavabit
Mounties always get their man: Heartbleed 'hacker', 19, CUFFED
Canadian teen accused of raiding tax computers using OpenSSL bug
One year on: diplomatic fail as Chinese APT gangs get back to work
Mandiant says past 12 months shows Beijing won't call off its hackers
Heartbleed exploit, inoculation, both released
File under 'this is going to hurt you more than it hurts me'
Arts and crafts store Michaels says 3 million credit cards exposed in breach
Meanwhile, Target investigators prepare for long process in nabbing hackers
prev story

Whitepapers

SANS - Survey on application security programs
In this whitepaper learn about the state of application security programs and practices of 488 surveyed respondents, and discover how mature and effective these programs are.
Combat fraud and increase customer satisfaction
Based on their experience using HP ArcSight Enterprise Security Manager for IT security operations, Finansbank moved to HP ArcSight ESM for fraud management.
The benefits of software based PBX
Why you should break free from your proprietary PBX and how to leverage your existing server hardware.
Top three mobile application threats
Learn about three of the top mobile application security threats facing businesses today and recommendations on how to mitigate the risk.
3 Big data security analytics techniques
Applying these Big Data security analytics techniques can help you make your business safer by detecting attacks early, before significant damage is done.