Feeds

WikiLeaks haters launch DDoS assault on Russia Today

In support of the Pussy Riot 3

High performance access to file storage

An anti-WikiLeaks group has admitted responsibility for a sustained DDoS attack that made the Russia Today website intermittently unavailable on Friday.

The Kremlin-funded channel features a talk show hosted by Julian Assange but posts by AntiLeaks, the group which launched the attack, suggest the assault has more to do with the controversial guilty verdict in the trial of Russian feminist punk rockers Pussy Riot.

All three members of Pussy Riot were jailed for two years on Friday after they were convicted for singing an anti-Putin song in Moscow's Orthodox Cathedral. They were convicted of "hooliganism motivated by religious hatred".

Russian Today (RT) confirmed a wave of assaults against its main website in a series of Twitter updates (here and here) and in a story on its website.

WikiLeaks condemned the attack on RT as an assault on free speech. "WikiLeaks condemns the attempt to censor RT. RT is an important alternative voice in the West," a tweet by the whistle-blowing group said.

RT's editorial line generally supports both Assange and Russian president Vladimir Putin.

Jeremy Nicholls, channel & business development director at DDoS mitigation specialists Arbor Networks, commented: “The attack against Russia Today highlights how DDoS is increasingly being used as a method of protest by activist groups in order to voice their frustrations.

"Hackers understand the damage they can inflict upon an organisation when they hit them with a DDoS attack, as they essentially shut down their entire business – meaning customers are unable to access their site, causing significant financial and reputational damage.

"It is therefore extremely important that organisations take the threat posed by cyber-criminals seriously. Organisations should not ask themselves if they will be attacked, they should ask themselves when they will be attacked. It is important for organisations to identify where their most critical assets lie within their network and ensure they are comprehensively protected from opportunistic hackers," he added. ®

High performance access to file storage

More from The Register

next story
Obama allows NSA to exploit 0-days: report
If the spooks say they need it, they get it
Parent gabfest Mumsnet hit by SSL bug: My heart bleeds, grins hacker
Natter-board tells middle-class Britain to purée its passwords
Web data BLEEDOUT: Users to feel the pain as Heartbleed bug revealed
Vendors and ISPs have work to do updating firmware - if it's possible to fix this
OpenSSL Heartbleed: Bloody nose for open-source bleeding hearts
Bloke behind the cockup says not enough people are helping crucial crypto project
One year on: diplomatic fail as Chinese APT gangs get back to work
Mandiant says past 12 months shows Beijing won't call off its hackers
Call of Duty 'fragged using OpenSSL's Heartbleed exploit'
So it begins ... or maybe not, says one analyst
Experian subsidiary faces MEGA-PROBE for 'selling consumer data to fraudster'
US attorneys general roll up sleeves, snap on gloves
NSA denies it knew about and USED Heartbleed encryption flaw for TWO YEARS
Agency forgets it exists to protect communications, not just spy on them
prev story

Whitepapers

Mainstay ROI - Does application security pay?
In this whitepaper learn how you and your enterprise might benefit from better software security.
Five 3D headsets to be won!
We were so impressed by the Durovis Dive headset we’ve asked the company to give some away to Reg readers.
3 Big data security analytics techniques
Applying these Big Data security analytics techniques can help you make your business safer by detecting attacks early, before significant damage is done.
The benefits of software based PBX
Why you should break free from your proprietary PBX and how to leverage your existing server hardware.
Mobile application security study
Download this report to see the alarming realities regarding the sheer number of applications vulnerable to attack, as well as the most common and easily addressable vulnerability errors.