Feeds

Ready to patent that 'new' invention? Google is here to dash your hopes

Prior Art Finder trawls through data in search for replication

Remote control for virtualized desktops

The technology giant has created a new 'Prior Art Finder' which enables users to search "multiple sources" in order to review whether ideas they hope to patent are in fact novel. The tool, which "instantly pulls together information relevant" to patent applications, will enable inventors to review documents submitted with both the United States Patent & Trademark Office and the European Patent Office, among other sources, Google said.

To qualify for patent protection inventions must primarily be new, take an inventive step that is not obvious and be useful to industry.

"To explain why an invention is new, inventors will usually cite prior art such as earlier patent applications or journal articles," Jon Orwant, engineering manager at Google, said in a company blog. "Determining the novelty of a patent can be difficult, requiring a laborious search through many sources, and so we’ve built a Prior Art Finder to make this process easier. With a single click, it searches multiple sources for related content that existed at the time the patent was filed."

"The Prior Art Finder identifies key phrases from the text of the patent, combines them into a search query, and displays relevant results from Google Patents, Google Scholar, Google Books, and the rest of the web," he added.

Orwant said he hoped the feature would supplement existing search methods patent applicants use and that the tool would be refined and extended once Google "develop a better understanding of how to analyse patent claims and how to integrate the results into the workflow of patent searchers."

Earlier this year Google announced that it had partnered with the EPO to introduce free new language translation technology on the EPO's website. At the time the EPO said that it had provided Google with "several hundred thousand high quality translations of patents" in English, German, French, Spanish, Italian, Portuguese and Swedish which Google had used to "train" its existing automated translation software.

Copyright © 2012, Out-Law.com

Out-Law.com is part of international law firm Pinsent Masons.

Beginner's guide to SSL certificates

More from The Register

next story
Bladerunner sequel might actually be good. Harrison Ford is in it
Go ahead, you're all clear, kid... Sorry, wrong film
Euro Parliament VOTES to BREAK UP GOOGLE. Er, OK then
It CANNA do it, captain.They DON'T have the POWER!
Musicians sue UK.gov over 'zero pay' copyright fix
Everyone else in Europe compensates us - why can't you?
I'll be back (and forward): Hollywood's time travel tribulations
Quick, call the Time Cops to sort out this paradox!
Megaupload overlord Kim Dotcom: The US HAS RADICALISED ME!
Now my lawyers have bailed 'cos I'm 'OFFICIALLY' BROKE
Forget Hillary, HP's ex CARLY FIORINA 'wants to be next US Prez'
Former CEO has political ambitions again, according to Washington DC sources
prev story

Whitepapers

Free virtual appliance for wire data analytics
The ExtraHop Discovery Edition is a free virtual appliance will help you to discover the performance of your applications across the network, web, VDI, database, and storage tiers.
Forging a new future with identity relationship management
Learn about ForgeRock's next generation IRM platform and how it is designed to empower CEOS's and enterprises to engage with consumers.
How to determine if cloud backup is right for your servers
Two key factors, technical feasibility and TCO economics, that backup and IT operations managers should consider when assessing cloud backup.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
Business security measures using SSL
Examines the major types of threats to information security that businesses face today and the techniques for mitigating those threats.