Feeds

SanDisk goes hard for soft VMware server caches

Forget cameras, the real action is speeding up virty machines

High performance access to file storage

SanDisk is touting a VMware server cache that could accelerate applications three to five times and increase the number of virtual machines a host can support by 100 to 200 per cent.

SanDisk has a long history of shipping consumer flash memory for gadgets including cameras and digital video recorders. It's lately moved into the enterprise server flash market, buying the Pliant controller business, the FlashSoft Windows and Linux PCIe caching business, Schooner Information Technology for its cacheing software, and launching server and client SSDs.

FlashSoft 3.0 supports VMware vSphere, installs in the host operating system and there are no agents in the virtual machines. It is implemented as an ESXi kernel module, and supports ESXi cluster features such as high-availability and vMotion, and full VDI support. It provides faster access to solid-state drives (SSDs) by bypassing the ESXi IO stack.

Any PCIe flash card, SAS or SATA SSDs can be used as the cache. Data needed by applications executing inside virtual machines is cached in the flash memory, avoiding time-consuming disk IO waits.

SanDisk says FlashSoft automatically ensures optimal cache usage per virtual machine, and assigns cache space dynamically even as new virtual machines are added. Cache content is preserved in the event of a virtual machine restart or host reboot, and cache metadata is restored in milliseconds. A vCenter plugin enables FlashSoft function management through the vCenter GUI.

SanDisk is competing with cache software suppliers Proximal Data, Nevex, NVelo and VeloBit. EMC has its VFCache product which does read caching. Fusion-io has ioTurbine, LSI has CacheCade, STEC has EnhanceIO and OCZ has SANRAD caching software. It's a crowded area.

The manufacturer's recommended pricing for a software licence per server is $3,000 for FlashSoft on Windows, $3,500 for Linux, and $3,900 for the VMware version. ®

High performance access to file storage

More from The Register

next story
Seagate brings out 6TB HDD, did not need NO STEENKIN' SHINGLES
Or helium filling either, according to reports
European Court of Justice rips up Data Retention Directive
Rules 'interfering' measure to be 'invalid'
Dropbox defends fantastically badly timed Condoleezza Rice appointment
'Nothing is going to change with Dr. Rice's appointment,' file sharer promises
Cisco reps flog Whiptail's Invicta arrays against EMC and Pure
Storage reseller report reveals who's selling what
Bored with trading oil and gold? Why not flog some CLOUD servers?
Chicago Mercantile Exchange plans cloud spot exchange
Just what could be inside Dropbox's new 'Home For Life'?
Biz apps, messaging, photos, email, more storage – sorry, did you think there would be cake?
IT bods: How long does it take YOU to train up on new tech?
I'll leave my arrays to do the hard work, if you don't mind
Amazon reveals its Google-killing 'R3' server instances
A mega-memory instance that never forgets
prev story

Whitepapers

Mainstay ROI - Does application security pay?
In this whitepaper learn how you and your enterprise might benefit from better software security.
Five 3D headsets to be won!
We were so impressed by the Durovis Dive headset we’ve asked the company to give some away to Reg readers.
3 Big data security analytics techniques
Applying these Big Data security analytics techniques can help you make your business safer by detecting attacks early, before significant damage is done.
The benefits of software based PBX
Why you should break free from your proprietary PBX and how to leverage your existing server hardware.
Mobile application security study
Download this report to see the alarming realities regarding the sheer number of applications vulnerable to attack, as well as the most common and easily addressable vulnerability errors.