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Burglar steals $60,000 of computers from Steve Jobs' home

Not a fanboi-targeted job it seems

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Police have arrested a man accused of breaking into the former home of Apple icon Steve Jobs and stealing over $60,000 worth of "computer equipment and personal items."

On July 17, Job's former home on Waverley Street in Palo Alto was broken into and turned over, AP reports. Santa Clara County Deputy District Attorney Tom Flattery, a member of the high-technology crimes unit, declined to say what exactly had been stolen but confirmed the police had a suspect in custody.

Kariem McFarlin, 35, was arrested on August 2 and charged with committing the thefts and selling stolen property. He's currently in the Alameda county jail, having failed to find $500,000 in bail money, and faces a possible prison term of seven years and eight months, including a one-year enhancement for "excessive taking of property."

Flattery refused to be drawn on exactly what was missing, or who it belonged to. But he said that the burglar seemed unaware of whose house he had broken into, indicating this wasn't a custom rip-off job for a fanboi.

"The best we can tell is it was totally random," Flattery told the San Jose Mercury News.

You might think $60,000 is a fair amount of kit to leave around the house, even in suburbs as flush with cash as Palo Alto and with computers as expensive as Apple's. But the docket also included 'personal items,' so jewelry belonging Jobs' widow Laurene Powell could be included in the robber's haul. ®

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