Feeds

Burglar steals $60,000 of computers from Steve Jobs' home

Not a fanboi-targeted job it seems

High performance access to file storage

Police have arrested a man accused of breaking into the former home of Apple icon Steve Jobs and stealing over $60,000 worth of "computer equipment and personal items."

On July 17, Job's former home on Waverley Street in Palo Alto was broken into and turned over, AP reports. Santa Clara County Deputy District Attorney Tom Flattery, a member of the high-technology crimes unit, declined to say what exactly had been stolen but confirmed the police had a suspect in custody.

Kariem McFarlin, 35, was arrested on August 2 and charged with committing the thefts and selling stolen property. He's currently in the Alameda county jail, having failed to find $500,000 in bail money, and faces a possible prison term of seven years and eight months, including a one-year enhancement for "excessive taking of property."

Flattery refused to be drawn on exactly what was missing, or who it belonged to. But he said that the burglar seemed unaware of whose house he had broken into, indicating this wasn't a custom rip-off job for a fanboi.

"The best we can tell is it was totally random," Flattery told the San Jose Mercury News.

You might think $60,000 is a fair amount of kit to leave around the house, even in suburbs as flush with cash as Palo Alto and with computers as expensive as Apple's. But the docket also included 'personal items,' so jewelry belonging Jobs' widow Laurene Powell could be included in the robber's haul. ®

High performance access to file storage

More from The Register

next story
Obama allows NSA to exploit 0-days: report
If the spooks say they need it, they get it
Parent gabfest Mumsnet hit by SSL bug: My heart bleeds, grins hacker
Natter-board tells middle-class Britain to purée its passwords
Web data BLEEDOUT: Users to feel the pain as Heartbleed bug revealed
Vendors and ISPs have work to do updating firmware - if it's possible to fix this
OpenSSL Heartbleed: Bloody nose for open-source bleeding hearts
Bloke behind the cockup says not enough people are helping crucial crypto project
One year on: diplomatic fail as Chinese APT gangs get back to work
Mandiant says past 12 months shows Beijing won't call off its hackers
Call of Duty 'fragged using OpenSSL's Heartbleed exploit'
So it begins ... or maybe not, says one analyst
German space centre endures cyber attack
Chinese code retrieved but NSA hack not ruled out
NSA denies it knew about and USED Heartbleed encryption flaw for TWO YEARS
Agency forgets it exists to protect communications, not just spy on them
prev story

Whitepapers

Securing web applications made simple and scalable
In this whitepaper learn how automated security testing can provide a simple and scalable way to protect your web applications.
Five 3D headsets to be won!
We were so impressed by the Durovis Dive headset we’ve asked the company to give some away to Reg readers.
HP ArcSight ESM solution helps Finansbank
Based on their experience using HP ArcSight Enterprise Security Manager for IT security operations, Finansbank moved to HP ArcSight ESM for fraud management.
The benefits of software based PBX
Why you should break free from your proprietary PBX and how to leverage your existing server hardware.
Mobile application security study
Download this report to see the alarming realities regarding the sheer number of applications vulnerable to attack, as well as the most common and easily addressable vulnerability errors.