Feeds

Tosh unzips 3.5incher for video, cloud, anyone with a wallet

All those photos and films need to be stored somewhere

Boost IT visibility and business value

Toshiba is rolling a line of 1TB-per-platter drives off the 3.5-inch assembly line Western Digital had to offload to get approval for its Hitachi GST acquisition.

Tosh has now joined Seagate and Western Digital in the 3.5-inch disk drive market.

It has three products. The DT01ACA desktop range comes with 1.5TB, 2TB and 3TB capacities and spins at 7,200rpm. They have a 6Gbit/s SATA interface, a 64MB cache and use the 4KB-per-block advanced storage format.

Toshiba 3TB desktop drive

Toshiba's DT01ACA300 drive.

There is a set-top box and digital video recorder version of these, for optimised for video streaming, called the DT01ACAxxxV and comes with the same three capacity levels. A slowed down, literally, version of the tech is in the DT01ABA family: this includes a 5,940rpm DT01ABA300 3TB drive and the DT01ABA150 and 200 drives spinning at 5,700 and offering 1.5 and 2TB capacities respectively. These disks have a smaller 32MB cache and the same 6Gbit/s SATA interface.

Martin Larsson, a VP at Toshiba Electronics Europe, played the flash-drive-with-spinning-disk card in his canned statement: “The new DT01AxA range further cements Toshiba’s position as the only vendor to develop and supply a complete storage product line up of SSDs and 2.5-inch and 3.5-inch HDDs.”

Of course, it's easy for Tosh to lord it up over 3.5-inch drives: its rivals, such as Seagate and its 15,000rpm 3.5in Cheetah, are steadily being replaced by flash memory and 2.5-inch hard drives as users want their data faster than 3.5-inchers can deliver.

Punters' desire to fondle tablets and Intel's slim specifications for its Ultrabook notebooks are increasing overall demand for storage: holding data in a device is so passe when you can upload your stuff to a networked file server or, brace yourself, even a cloud. Big fat 3.5-inch data tubs are best-positioned to satisfy this need.

Toshiba hopes to sell its 3.5-inchers alongside its 2.5-inch drives. We may see a line of 3.5-inch Tosh external storage products. Adding a fourth platter could produce a 4TB drive and that is also a possibility. ®

The essential guide to IT transformation

More from The Register

next story
The Return of BSOD: Does ANYONE trust Microsoft patches?
Sysadmins, you're either fighting fires or seen as incompetents now
Microsoft: Azure isn't ready for biz-critical apps … yet
Microsoft will move its own IT to the cloud to avoid $200m server bill
US regulators OK sale of IBM's x86 server biz to Lenovo
Now all that remains is for gov't offices to ban the boxes
Flash could be CHEAPER than SAS DISK? Come off it, NetApp
Stats analysis reckons we'll hit that point in just three years
Oracle reveals 32-core, 10 BEEELLION-transistor SPARC M7
New chip scales to 1024 cores, 8192 threads 64 TB RAM, at speeds over 3.6GHz
Object storage bods Exablox: RAID is dead, baby. RAID is dead
Bring your own disks to its object appliances
Nimble's latest mutants GORGE themselves on unlucky forerunners
Crossing Sandy Bridges without stopping for breath
prev story

Whitepapers

5 things you didn’t know about cloud backup
IT departments are embracing cloud backup, but there’s a lot you need to know before choosing a service provider. Learn all the critical things you need to know.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Build a business case: developing custom apps
Learn how to maximize the value of custom applications by accelerating and simplifying their development.
Rethinking backup and recovery in the modern data center
Combining intelligence, operational analytics, and automation to enable efficient, data-driven IT organizations using the HP ABR approach.
Next gen security for virtualised datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.