Feeds

LinkedIn tweaks API terms of use for itchy developers

Hopes to ease coder anxiety by raising privacy eyebrows

Internet Security Threat Report 2014

Social-networking-for-suits outfit LinkedIn has revamped its application programming interface (API) terms of use to allow developers to better exploit the website.

The company said yesterday in a blog post that it wanted to "enable our members to use their LinkedIn identity wherever they may be online" in a move that mirrors Facebook, which allows its users to comment on other sites using their FB login.

LinkedIn said:

We also want our members to have the ability to tap their professional network to discuss and share what matters most to them whether they’re on or off LinkedIn.com.

Over the past year, we’ve been working closely with more than 75k developers to make this possible for our members, by helping developers leverage LinkedIn’s rich technology to build unique and innovative tools for professionals across the web.

The company has also appeased its network of third-party coders by applying updates to the LinkedIn Developer Platform. It claimed more than 1 million publisher sites were already providing a "share content" button to LinkedIn on their online properties.

What this means in practice is that the company will grant outside developers access to email addresses for its users upon request. Those coders will be able to "specify permissions from users who want to use their LinkedIn credentials to sign in and register for applications," the firm explained.

LinkedIn, which has around 175 million active users, came under fire recently after it admitted that a list of 6.5 million user passwords had been leaked online.

It tightened up security after the embarrassing breach.

Meanwhile, it's unsurprising to see LinkedIn securing what is, in effect, a distribution deal with publishers. This comes in the wake of Twitter cutting its syndication agreement with the network last month. ®

Security for virtualized datacentres

More from The Register

next story
Microsoft WINDOWS 10: Seven ATE Nine. Or Eight did really
Windows NEIN skipped, tech preview due out on Wednesday
Business is back, baby! Hasta la VISTA, Win 8... Oh, yeah, Windows 9
Forget touchscreen millennials, Microsoft goes for mouse crowd
Apple: SO sorry for the iOS 8.0.1 UPDATE BUNGLE HORROR
Apple kills 'upgrade'. Hey, Microsoft. You sure you want to be like these guys?
ARM gives Internet of Things a piece of its mind – the Cortex-M7
32-bit core packs some DSP for VIP IoT CPU LOL
Microsoft on the Threshold of a new name for Windows next week
Rebranded OS reportedly set to be flung open by Redmond
Lotus Notes inventor Ozzie invents app to talk to people on your phone
Imagine that. Startup floats with voice collab app for Win iPhone
prev story

Whitepapers

Forging a new future with identity relationship management
Learn about ForgeRock's next generation IRM platform and how it is designed to empower CEOS's and enterprises to engage with consumers.
Storage capacity and performance optimization at Mizuno USA
Mizuno USA turn to Tegile storage technology to solve both their SAN and backup issues.
The next step in data security
With recent increased privacy concerns and computers becoming more powerful, the chance of hackers being able to crack smaller-sized RSA keys increases.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.
A strategic approach to identity relationship management
ForgeRock commissioned Forrester to evaluate companies’ IAM practices and requirements when it comes to customer-facing scenarios versus employee-facing ones.