Feeds

HP yanks 2-week-old VMware server crown from Cisco

Flash-boosted ProLiant beats down rivals in benchmark test

3 Big data security analytics techniques

Hard on the heels of Cisco bragging about a flash-assisted VMmark win, HP has kicked it into touch with a better score using a flash-boosted ProLiant server.

VMware's VMmark benchmark measures how a server runs simultaneous VMware virtual machines (VMs) which, in turn, run typical business applications. The VMs are grouped into sets of eight, called tiles. Each tile has a score and these are aggregated into a finished number, such as 10@7 tiles, meaning that the score was 10 with seven tiles running simultaneously.

If two servers both achieve 10, but one at 7 tiles and the other at 10, then the lower tile server is recommended by VMware, as a higher tile count may suggest that the server's workload was not properly balanced. Otherwise higher scores generally go with higher tile counts.

Cisco's UCS B200 M3 blade server, a 2-socket machine, scored 11.3@10 tiles on the VMmark 2.1 benchmark, using a Violin 6000 flash array with 16TB of raw flash. That beat an HP ProLiant DL385p Gen 8 server which achieved 8.31@8 tiles.

But an HP ProLiant DL560 gen 8 server – a 4-processor 2-node system, fitted with 400GB SAS SSDs and 146GB 15K rpm SAS 2.5-inch disk drives, 28 disk/flash drives in total – scored 18.27@18 tiles. There were two external storage controllers, each with 3TB of SSDs, a third with the hard disk drives, and a fourth with no drives. The configuration details can be seen here (PDF).

HP provides comparative 4-processor, 2-node server scores for our (and its won) pleasure:

  • Fujitsu Primergy RX600 did 18.20@18 tiles using 261 drves.
  • Cisco's UCS C460 M2 did 18@18 tiles using 261 drives.
  • A Dell PowerEdge R910 achieved 17.63@18 tiles with 229 drives.

It's quite obvious, isn't it: SSDs respond to random I/O requests much more quickly than spinning disk does. The HP server wasn't that much faster overall than the others, but it needed less rack space, power and cooling to do the job because it used a few solid state drives rather than relying on disk spindles to feed the servers' I/O demands. ®

SANS - Survey on application security programs

More from The Register

next story
This time it's 'Personal': new Office 365 sub covers just two devices
Redmond also brings Office into Google's back yard
Kingston DataTraveler MicroDuo: Turn your phone into a 72GB beast
USB-usiness in the front, micro-USB party in the back
AMD's 'Seattle' 64-bit ARM server chips now sampling, set to launch in late 2014
But they won't appear in SeaMicro Fabric Compute Systems anytime soon
Brit boffins use TARDIS to re-route data flows through time and space
'Traffic Assignment and Retiming Dynamics with Inherent Stability' algo can save ISPs big bucks
prev story

Whitepapers

Mainstay ROI - Does application security pay?
In this whitepaper learn how you and your enterprise might benefit from better software security.
Combat fraud and increase customer satisfaction
Based on their experience using HP ArcSight Enterprise Security Manager for IT security operations, Finansbank moved to HP ArcSight ESM for fraud management.
The benefits of software based PBX
Why you should break free from your proprietary PBX and how to leverage your existing server hardware.
Top three mobile application threats
Learn about three of the top mobile application security threats facing businesses today and recommendations on how to mitigate the risk.
3 Big data security analytics techniques
Applying these Big Data security analytics techniques can help you make your business safer by detecting attacks early, before significant damage is done.