Feeds

Alleged Anon arrested for planning gov DDoS attacks

21-year-old could face five years in a Hong Kong slammer

Build a business case: developing custom apps

Hong Kong police have arrested a 21-year-old man after he apparently bragged on Facebook of his intent to disrupt several government web sites.

Local cops are not releasing much information except to say that the man was arrested last Friday and later released on bail, with an order to report back in October.

He was cuffed after threatening to launch DDoS attacks against seven government sites.

Section 161 of the Crimes Ordinance states it is an offence “to obtain access to a computer with an intent to commit an offence”, and if found guilty the perpetrator could face up to five years in the slammer.

Although police were tight-lipped, local media reports said the man claims to be part of the local chapter of hacktivist group Anonymous.

"Many protesters are resorting to hacking because normal demonstrations are hampered by public order laws and the police," he told the South China Morning Post.

One would usually expect an accompanying blaze of publicity via social media channels if this were the case, but the group’s @AnonymousAHK Twitter feed has not been updated since 28 April and its Facebook page has little in the way of the usual provocative messages.

In fact, Anonymous activity in the China region has been virtually non-existent since the group claimed the scalps of hundreds of government and business web sites back in April.

For Hong Kong businesses and government institutions the bigger threat at the moment is the more traditional one of financially-motivated cyber criminals looking either to steal valuable IP or blackmail firms with the threat of DDoS attacks.

Last month, Chinese police busted one such gang, which had targeted gold, silver and securities traders in Hong Kong. ®

Endpoint data privacy in the cloud is easier than you think

More from The Register

next story
14 antivirus apps found to have security problems
Vendors just don't care, says researcher, after finding basic boo-boos in security software
Microsoft's Euro cloud darkens: US FEDS can dig into foreign servers
They're not emails, they're business records, says court
'Things' on the Internet-of-things have 25 vulnerabilities apiece
Leaking sprinklers, overheated thermostats and picked locks all online
iWallet: No BONKING PLEASE, we're Apple
BLE-ding iPhones, not NFC bonkers, will drive trend - marketeers
Multipath TCP speeds up the internet so much that security breaks
Black Hat research says proposed protocol will bork network probes, flummox firewalls
Only '3% of web servers in top corps' fully fixed after Heartbleed snafu
Just slapping a patched OpenSSL on a machine ain't going to cut it, we're told
Plug and PREY: Hackers reprogram USB drives to silently infect PCs
BadUSB instructs gadget chips to inject key-presses, redirect net traffic and more
How long is too long to wait for a security fix?
Synology finally patches OpenSSL bugs in Trevor's NAS
prev story

Whitepapers

7 Elements of Radically Simple OS Migration
Avoid the typical headaches of OS migration during your next project by learning about 7 elements of radically simple OS migration.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Consolidation: The Foundation for IT Business Transformation
In this whitepaper learn how effective consolidation of IT and business resources can enable multiple, meaningful business benefits.
Solving today's distributed Big Data backup challenges
Enable IT efficiency and allow a firm to access and reuse corporate information for competitive advantage, ultimately changing business outcomes.
A new approach to endpoint data protection
What is the best way to ensure comprehensive visibility, management, and control of information on both company-owned and employee-owned devices?