Feeds

Alleged Anon arrested for planning gov DDoS attacks

21-year-old could face five years in a Hong Kong slammer

SANS - Survey on application security programs

Hong Kong police have arrested a 21-year-old man after he apparently bragged on Facebook of his intent to disrupt several government web sites.

Local cops are not releasing much information except to say that the man was arrested last Friday and later released on bail, with an order to report back in October.

He was cuffed after threatening to launch DDoS attacks against seven government sites.

Section 161 of the Crimes Ordinance states it is an offence “to obtain access to a computer with an intent to commit an offence”, and if found guilty the perpetrator could face up to five years in the slammer.

Although police were tight-lipped, local media reports said the man claims to be part of the local chapter of hacktivist group Anonymous.

"Many protesters are resorting to hacking because normal demonstrations are hampered by public order laws and the police," he told the South China Morning Post.

One would usually expect an accompanying blaze of publicity via social media channels if this were the case, but the group’s @AnonymousAHK Twitter feed has not been updated since 28 April and its Facebook page has little in the way of the usual provocative messages.

In fact, Anonymous activity in the China region has been virtually non-existent since the group claimed the scalps of hundreds of government and business web sites back in April.

For Hong Kong businesses and government institutions the bigger threat at the moment is the more traditional one of financially-motivated cyber criminals looking either to steal valuable IP or blackmail firms with the threat of DDoS attacks.

Last month, Chinese police busted one such gang, which had targeted gold, silver and securities traders in Hong Kong. ®

High performance access to file storage

More from The Register

next story
Obama allows NSA to exploit 0-days: report
If the spooks say they need it, they get it
Samsung Galaxy S5 fingerprint scanner hacked in just 4 DAYS
Sammy's newbie cooked slower than iPhone, also costs more to build
Snowden-inspired crypto-email service Lavaboom launches
German service pays tribute to Lavabit
Mounties always get their man: Heartbleed 'hacker', 19, CUFFED
Canadian teen accused of raiding tax computers using OpenSSL bug
One year on: diplomatic fail as Chinese APT gangs get back to work
Mandiant says past 12 months shows Beijing won't call off its hackers
Call of Duty 'fragged using OpenSSL's Heartbleed exploit'
So it begins ... or maybe not, says one analyst
prev story

Whitepapers

Top three mobile application threats
Learn about three of the top mobile application security threats facing businesses today and recommendations on how to mitigate the risk.
Combat fraud and increase customer satisfaction
Based on their experience using HP ArcSight Enterprise Security Manager for IT security operations, Finansbank moved to HP ArcSight ESM for fraud management.
The benefits of software based PBX
Why you should break free from your proprietary PBX and how to leverage your existing server hardware.
Five 3D headsets to be won!
We were so impressed by the Durovis Dive headset we’ve asked the company to give some away to Reg readers.
SANS - Survey on application security programs
In this whitepaper learn about the state of application security programs and practices of 488 surveyed respondents, and discover how mature and effective these programs are.