Feeds

Apple and Google go head-to-head over Kodak patent sale

Tech firms draw battle lines in IP auction

Next gen security for virtualised datacentres

Apple and Google have joined rival investor groups hoping to bag Kodak's 1,100-strong patent portfolio. The groups are offering warm-up bids of between $150m and $250m – though Kodak reckons the patents could eventually haul in up to $2.6bn.

Apple is part of a group that includes Microsoft and patent aggregation firm Intellectual Ventures Management, the Wall Street Journal heard from sources. The competing group has Google, Samsung, LG and HTC in it as well as patent firm RPX. Both lots started their bidding last week.

Already facing each other, indirectly, in the various patent battles sprawled across the globe, the fruity firm and the Chocolate Factory are going head-to-head to seize the digital imaging portfolio from bankrupt Kodak, which includes patents Apple has already tried to claim it owns.

The companies squared up last year over the auction from Nortel Networks, with an Apple and Microsoft group bagging the portfolio with a winning bid of $4.5bn.

Patent sales like this are big business, enough so that Kodak hopes the sale could help it dig its way out of the red and into being a printer company. The firm has said it reckons the portfolio on the auction block could be worth up to $2.6bn.

Bids normally start small to show interest and draw out the competition before the serious negotiations start.

Kodak's digital capture patents are the ones the smartphone and tablet makers are after, because the technology is also used to snap pics on mobile devices.

The patent aggregation firms have joined the consortia to bag intellectual property – which they can later charge other firms for using, bagging licensing fees or even court damages.

The auction is set for tomorrow. ®

The essential guide to IT transformation

More from The Register

next story
Super Cali signs a kill-switch, campaigners say it's atrocious
Remote-death button bad news for crooks, protesters – and great news for hackers?
Ex US cybersecurity czar guilty in child sex abuse website case
Health and Human Services IT security chief headed online to share vile images
Don't even THINK about copyright violation, says Indian state
Pre-emptive arrest for pirates in Karnataka
The police are WRONG: Watching YouTube videos is NOT illegal
And our man Corfield is pretty bloody cross about it
Felony charges? Harsh! Alleged Anon hackers plead guilty to misdemeanours
US judge questions harsh sentence sought by prosecutors
Oz biz regulator discovers shared servers in EPIC FACEPALM
'Not aware' that one IP can hold more than one Website
prev story

Whitepapers

Best practices for enterprise data
Discussing how technology providers have innovated in order to solve new challenges, creating a new framework for enterprise data.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Advanced data protection for your virtualized environments
Find a natural fit for optimizing protection for the often resource-constrained data protection process found in virtual environments.
How modern custom applications can spur business growth
Learn how to create, deploy and manage custom applications without consuming or expanding the need for scarce, expensive IT resources.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?