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IOC asks Olympic spectators to cut back TXTs and tweets

Network congestion blamed for Beeb’s bike bungles

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The International Olympic Committee (IOC) has blamed spectators’ twitchy thumbs for the infamously spotty television coverage of the Men’s Olympic Cycling Road Race.

Reuters reports an un-named official said the sheer volume of data traffic generated by the million-plus spectators on the route prevented cyclists’ GPS units from phoning home. That left broadcasters without accurate tracking of riders’ positions, which in turn left the BBC apologising for what it told The Grauniad was “appalling” coverage of the event.

Reuters quotes the official as saying “if it's not an urgent, urgent one, please kind of take it easy”. And yes, that is about tweets and TXTs, not a comment on positioning of other Olympic facilities.

British race favourite Mark Cavendish, who finished 29th, blamed negative tactics by Australia’s team for his poor finish. The Reg’s antipodean bureau vigorously refutes that allegation. ®

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