Feeds

Daily Mail group boss spoof tweeter fights to protect anonymity

@UnSteveDorkland lawyers up after publisher sues Twitter

High performance access to file storage

An anonymous wag who lampooned a Daily Mail group boss using a spoof Twitter account has six days to prevent his unmasking.

The publishing giant launched legal action in California to compel the social network to reveal the identity of whoever's behind the @UnSteveDorkland handle. The account sends up Steve Auckland, the former Metro managing director who is now CEO of Northcliffe Media, the British regional newspaper arm of the Daily Mail and General Trust.

Twitter's lawyers said the tweeter has six days to object to the court order. An email from the social network's legal team, seen by The Register, suggests that UnSteveDorkland contacts rights campaign group Electronic Frontier Foundation for advice.

If no objection to the order is received by Twitter by 1 August then it will hand over what personal details it holds on the user to the troubled publisher, the email stated. The court writ requested all data associated with the account, including an email address, a record of logins, IP addresses, and private messages sent from and to the account.

The Not Steve Dorkland twitter account, screengrab

The fake Steve Auckland's typical banter

According to the court document [hosted on the political tittle-tattle Order Order blog] anyone hoping to quash or modify the subpoena must successfully argue that the information required is privileged or should be subject to protection.

UnSteve told The Reg that a Californian lawyer has offered to represent him pro bono. Northcliffe Media has yet to supply us with a statement but we will update this story if it does.

Twitter declined to comment on this specific case. When asked whether the social network is failing to protect anonymous users, a spokesperson would say only: "In all such cases, Twitter believes it has to comply with a ruling from courts in its Californian home, but give those targeted the information they need to get a lawyer and defend themselves." ®

SANS - Survey on application security programs

More from The Register

next story
Dropbox defends fantastically badly timed Condoleezza Rice appointment
'Nothing is going to change with Dr. Rice's appointment,' file sharer promises
Audio fans, prepare yourself for the Second Coming ... of Blu-ray
High Fidelity Pure Audio – is this what your ears have been waiting for?
Record labels sue Pandora over vintage song royalties
Companies want payout on recordings made before 1972
MtGox chief Karpelès refuses to come to US for g-men's grilling
Bitcoin baron says he needs another lawyer for FinCEN chat
Zucker punched: Google gobbles Facebook-wooed Titan Aerospace
Up, up and away in my beautiful balloon flying broadband-bot
Apple DOMINATES the Valley, rakes in more profit than Google, HP, Intel, Cisco COMBINED
Cook & Co. also pay more taxes than those four worthies PLUS eBay and Oracle
Number crunching suggests Yahoo! US is worth less than nothing
China and Japan holdings worth more than entire company
prev story

Whitepapers

SANS - Survey on application security programs
In this whitepaper learn about the state of application security programs and practices of 488 surveyed respondents, and discover how mature and effective these programs are.
Combat fraud and increase customer satisfaction
Based on their experience using HP ArcSight Enterprise Security Manager for IT security operations, Finansbank moved to HP ArcSight ESM for fraud management.
The benefits of software based PBX
Why you should break free from your proprietary PBX and how to leverage your existing server hardware.
Top three mobile application threats
Learn about three of the top mobile application security threats facing businesses today and recommendations on how to mitigate the risk.
3 Big data security analytics techniques
Applying these Big Data security analytics techniques can help you make your business safer by detecting attacks early, before significant damage is done.