Feeds

Oops: Nokia reinstates 'terminated' star app developer

Keep your friends close, kick your good friends out the door

Securing Web Applications Made Simple and Scalable

You may think Nokia needs to keep all the app developers it can muster loyal to the company - but last week it terminated VIP privileges for a star Symbian programmer. Nokia has since changed its mind.

The brains behind the highly regarded Gravity application, Jan Ole Suhr, was one of a number of Symbian coders who discovered their membership of the Nokia Developer Champions programme had been terminated early. This is a scheme that recognises key programmers and gives them early access to tools and technical information.

But Symbian - the mobile phone operating system now officially known as "Nokia Belle" - is no more: there are no future handsets on the drawing board, and just a small fraction of the 3,000 Nokia engineers who worked on the platform are actively developing Symbian at Accenture. Nokia spun them out last year.

Gravity on Symbian 3

"It is hard not to see the decision to cut short membership as both shortsighted and rather mean-spirited," thinks Rafe Blandford, a former member of the NDC programme's predecessor.

Suhr said Nokia rescinded the decision this week, reinstating him as a champion. But he's still undecided about which mobile platform he should target.

Gravity handles Facebook, Twitter and Google Reader RSS feeds - and in terms of quality he has the Symbian market pretty much to himself. iPhone and Android have established apps offering the same features, and although the marketplaces for these two platforms are much more competitive, they are far larger, Suhr notes.

In the bigger scheme of things, with Microsoft's deep pockets and historical skills of cuddling would-be developers, Nokia's haste to dump Suhr shouldn't matter. But he points out something rather more significant. In the rush to bring Windows Phone 8 to market, Microsoft seems to have forgotten about app makers. He notes that a stable development kit and software interfaces are still missing in action.

With the first WP8 phones rumoured to be announced in just six weeks, this appears to be a quite amazing oversight. Just yesterday we reported a sharp fall in the number of mobile developers interested in building applications for Windows Phone. ®

Bridging the IT gap between rising business demands and ageing tools

More from The Register

next story
KDE releases ice-cream coloured Plasma 5 just in time for summer
Melty but refreshing - popular rival to Mint's Cinnamon's still a work in progress
NO MORE ALL CAPS and other pleasures of Visual Studio 14
Unpicking a packed preview that breaks down ASP.NET
Secure microkernel that uses maths to be 'bug free' goes open source
Hacker-repelling, drone-protecting code will soon be yours to tweak as you see fit
Cheer up, Nokia fans. It can start making mobes again in 18 months
The real winner of the Nokia sale is *drumroll* ... Nokia
Put down that Oracle database patch: It could cost $23,000 per CPU
On-by-default INMEMORY tech a boon for developers ... as long as they can afford it
Another day, another Firefox: Version 31 is upon us ALREADY
Web devs, Mozilla really wants you to like this one
Google shows off new Chrome OS look
Athena springs full-grown from Chromium project's head
prev story

Whitepapers

Designing a Defense for Mobile Applications
Learn about the various considerations for defending mobile applications - from the application architecture itself to the myriad testing technologies.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Top 8 considerations to enable and simplify mobility
In this whitepaper learn how to successfully add mobile capabilities simply and cost effectively.
Seven Steps to Software Security
Seven practical steps you can begin to take today to secure your applications and prevent the damages a successful cyber-attack can cause.
Boost IT visibility and business value
How building a great service catalog relieves pressure points and demonstrates the value of IT service management.