Feeds

Capita and pals get £500m for ZOMBIE APOCALYPSE call centre

UK-wide deal covers 'any health-related emergency'

Security for virtualized datacentres

The Department of Health (DH) has awarded a framework agreement to four suppliers for health-related managed contact centre services, worth up to £500m.

Capita Customer Management, 118, Vangent and MM Teleperformance have been named as the chosen suppliers. According to a notice in the Official Journal of the European Union, the firms will provide contact centre services across health and social care bodies throughout the UK.

"These [contact centre] services will offer a flexible on-demand solution for use in all or any of the following scenarios: pandemic, including but not limited to delivery of contact centre services for the National Pandemic Flu Service; any other health-related emergency circumstances; and any other health-related activities that require contact centre service support," says the notice.

The suppliers will be expected to provide a "comprehensive solution" to meet the needs of the bodies involved in the framework. The notice explains that this may include all the elements required to deliver contact centre services including people, processes, systems, technology, facilities and equipment.

Additional components may also be included for other service enhancements such as speech recognition, call recording, languages, and other ancillary contact centre services.

During the 2009 flu pandemic, NHS Direct was responsible for the day-to-day operation of the National Pandemic Flu Service, which was set up to assess patients with flu-like symptoms via the telephone or the internet.

The government's 111 non-emergency NHS care and advice service is set to eventually replace NHS Direct. But in June the DH extended the 111 roll-out deadline to give areas enough time to plan for the service.

The DH did not respond when asked for comment about the contract award.

This article was originally published at Government Computing.

Government Computing covers the latest news and analysis of public sector technology. For updates on public sector IT, join the Government Computing Network here.

Security for virtualized datacentres

More from The Register

next story
Phones 4u slips into administration after EE cuts ties with Brit mobe retailer
More than 5,500 jobs could be axed if rescue mission fails
Driving with an Apple Watch could land you with a £100 FINE
Bad news for tech-addicted fanbois behind the wheel
Phones 4u website DIES as wounded mobe retailer struggles to stay above water
Founder blames 'ruthless network partners' for implosion
Sony says year's losses will be FOUR TIMES DEEPER than thought
Losses of more than $2 BILLION loom over troubled Japanese corp
Radio hams can encrypt, in emergencies, says Ofcom
Consultation promises new spectrum and hints at relaxed licence conditions
Special pleading against mass surveillance won't help anyone
Protecting journalists alone won't protect their sources
Big Content Australia just blew a big hole in its credibility
AHEDA's research on average content prices did not expose methodology, so appears less than rigourous
Bono: Apple will sort out monetising music where the labels failed
Remastered so hard it would be difficult or impossible to master it again
prev story

Whitepapers

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops
Balancing user privacy and privileged access, in accordance with compliance frameworks and legislation. Evaluating any potential remote control choice.
WIN a very cool portable ZX Spectrum
Win a one-off portable Spectrum built by legendary hardware hacker Ben Heck
Storage capacity and performance optimization at Mizuno USA
Mizuno USA turn to Tegile storage technology to solve both their SAN and backup issues.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
The next step in data security
With recent increased privacy concerns and computers becoming more powerful, the chance of hackers being able to crack smaller-sized RSA keys increases.