Feeds

Iranian nuke plants rocked in midnight 'heavy metal blast'

Boffins suffer AC-DC problems as virus defences ramped up

Remote control for virtualized desktops

Iran's military will establish a cyber-defence headquarters, the country's official news agency IRNA reports - just in time to sort out an alleged heavy-metal infection at its nuclear labs.

The centre - staffed by an unspecified number of personnel - "would be commissioned to design and adopt comprehensive approaches in line with cultural onslaught of the enemies", according to Brigadier Seyyed Mas’oud Jazayeri. Iran's Revolutionary Guards are already actively involved in propaganda battles against the influence of Western media in Iran, all the while spreading the Islamic Republic message abroad and limiting the usefulness of social networks used to organise protests in the country.

The new unit could be an extenuation of these activities, rather than an attempt to counter or respond to Stuxnet - the virus that sabotaged machines associated with Iran's controversial uranium enrichment programme - or Flame, the super-espionage tool.

Sanctions prevent Iran from purchasing Western antivirus technology. In response, the country is developing its own homegrown malware-catching technology, the effectiveness of which remains unclear.

The need for Iran to develop security software in the face of continuing electronic assault is all too clear. For example, Finnish software firm F-Secure reports that an email from someone within the network of the Atomic Energy Organisation of Iran (AEOI) claimed a worm played Thunderstruck by AC/DC at high volume throughout the night. The hacker, it is alleged, used Metasploit to find vulnerable systems. Infection by the worm supposedly forced sysadmins to "shut down the automation network" at Natanz and another facility Fordo near Qom.

F-Secure is unable to confirm the report beyond being able to say that the email was sent from AEOI's network. Stealth is a primary requirement of cyber-espionage attacks, and the appearance of a worm that turns the volume up to 11 is hardly fitting with this - unless the goal of the malware is to drive scientists and other workers in Iran's nuclear programme to distraction. ®

Intelligent flash storage arrays

More from The Register

next story
Webcam hacker pervs in MASS HOME INVASION
You thought you were all alone? Nope – change your password, says ICO
You really need to do some tech support for Aunty Agnes
Free anti-virus software, expires, stops updating and p0wns the world
USB coding anarchy: Consider all sticks licked
Thumb drive design ruled by almighty buck
Attack reveals 81 percent of Tor users but admins call for calm
Cisco Netflow a handy tool for cheapskate attackers
Privacy bods offer GOV SPY VICTIMS a FREE SPYWARE SNIFFER
Looks for gov malware that evades most antivirus
Patch NOW! Microsoft slings emergency bug fix at Windows admins
Vulnerability promotes lusers to domain overlords ... oops
prev story

Whitepapers

Why cloud backup?
Combining the latest advancements in disk-based backup with secure, integrated, cloud technologies offer organizations fast and assured recovery of their critical enterprise data.
Forging a new future with identity relationship management
Learn about ForgeRock's next generation IRM platform and how it is designed to empower CEOS's and enterprises to engage with consumers.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
Choosing a cloud hosting partner with confidence
Download Choosing a Cloud Hosting Provider with Confidence to learn more about cloud computing - the new opportunities and new security challenges.
Storage capacity and performance optimization at Mizuno USA
Mizuno USA turn to Tegile storage technology to solve both their SAN and backup issues.