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Taiwan boots up virtual war games

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Taiwan has launched a five day computer-aided war simulation exercise designed to test the country’s army, navy and air force against an attack from near neighbour China.

The virtual war games will see how well Taiwan’s armed forces cope with ballistic and cruise missile attacks as well as intrusions from drone-like unmanned aerial vehicles, according to the Taipei Times.

The simulation has been set-up to include military equipment and vehicles not yet delivered to the Taiwanese forces including the antisubmarine P-3C “Orion” maritime patrol aircraft, and AH-64D Longbow attack helicopters, the report said.

Taiwan has apparently bought 12 refurbished P-3C aircraft and 30 of the choppers from the US to boost its military against the might of the People’s Liberation Army.

The war games are also believed to feature information warfare scenarios, given that China is suspected of developing advanced capabilities in this area to disrupt and control its opponents before a shot has been fired.

The exercise is the second stage of Taiwan’s 'Han Kuang 28' series of drills, following similar exercises back in April.

Relations are improving between Taiwan and mainland China, helped in no small part by the hugely lucrative trade ties between the two, especially in the technology industry.

Taiwanese ODMs including Compal, Wistron and Foxconn – which between them produce most of the world’s PCs – all have significant manufacturing bases in China.

However, there is still niggle between the two and many in the Chinese Communist Party would like to see Taiwan forced officially under the rule of the People’s Republic.

Given the continued cross-Strait tensions, it’s not surprising that state-sponsored cyber espionage is believed to be widespread. Most recently, China was blamed after a laptop went missing from a Taiwanese navy missile boat. ®

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