Feeds

Much of China still has rubbish net connections, stats show

Fleabitten British lion still faster than snoozing dragon

Choosing a cloud hosting partner with confidence

China may have the full weight of the government behind its push towards improving fixed line broadband penetration in the country, but it’s still lagging far behind the UK, according to the latest stats from local content delivery firm ChinaCache.

The report, handily translated by TechInAsia, show the average connection speeds for each of the country’s provinces, including Shanghai and Beijing, over the first half of 2012.

What it shows, as many businesses and home workers in the region will already attest to, is that despite China’s ambitious plans to build out fibre optic networks, connection speeds can be frustratingly low.

Perhaps unsurprisingly, Shanghai and Beijing come top with average connection speeds of around 4Mbps and 3.6Mbps respectively. After this there’s a pretty disappointing drop-off, the Anhui province coming next with an average speed of less than 3Mbps.

The bottom three regions - Shanxi, Guangxi and Xinjiang – which between them have a population of over 100 million people, all fail to top 1.5Mbps, showing the huge digital divide which still exists in the country between the major cities and far-flung provinces.

Content delivery firm Akamai’s most recent State of the Internet report for Q4 2011 claimed just 20 per cent of China has speeds of over 2Mbps, placing it 78th globally.

By comparison, it said the UK has 91 per cent of households above this basic minimum and ranked 12th. Acton was the fastest location with an average peak connection speed of 27.8Mbps.

What can make matters worse for internet users in China is the additional delays, time-outs and general disruption caused by the Great Firewall, or any censorship-bypassing VPN technology they’ve been forced to install to visit specific banned sites.

To be fair, the Chinese government has acknowledged the vital importance to the economy of a strong internet infrastructure, and has pledged 80 per cent of a $303 billion infrastructure investment to broadband development.

It said that by 2015, fixed broadband connections will exceed 370 million, adding the following in a recent human rights action plan:

The internet connection speed for urban households will reach 20Mbps, and that for rural households, 4Mbps. Fibre optic internet connection will cover 200 million households. In addition, China will build wireless broadband cities, and gradually spread internet connections and usage throughout the rural areas.

Historically the country’s vast and unforgiving geography has kept broadband prices high and limited the expansion of internet infrastructure, but this will change – it just depends on how quickly.

In the meantime, the best option for many firms, especially those with a strong B2C presence in the People’s Republic, will be to invest in a content delivery service. ®

Security for virtualized datacentres

More from The Register

next story
TEEN RAMPAGE: Kids in iPhone 6 'Will it bend' YouTube 'prank'
iPhones bent in Norwich? As if the place wasn't weird enough
Consumers agree to give up first-born child for free Wi-Fi – survey
This Herod network's ace – but crap reception in bullrushes
Crouching tiger, FAST ASLEEP dragon: Smugglers can't shift iPhone 6s
China's grey market reports 'sluggish' sales of Apple mobe
Sea-Me-We 5 construction starts
New sub cable to go live 2016
New EU digi-commish struggles with concepts of net neutrality
Oettinger all about the infrastructure – but not big on substance
PEAK IPV4? Global IPv6 traffic is growing, DDoS dying, says Akamai
First time the cache network has seen drop in use of 32-bit-wide IP addresses
EE coughs to BROKEN data usage metrics BLUNDER that short-changes customers
Carrier apologises for 'inflated' measurements cockup
Comcast: Help, help, FCC. Netflix and pals are EXTORTIONISTS
The others guys are being mean so therefore ... monopoly all good, yeah?
prev story

Whitepapers

Forging a new future with identity relationship management
Learn about ForgeRock's next generation IRM platform and how it is designed to empower CEOS's and enterprises to engage with consumers.
Storage capacity and performance optimization at Mizuno USA
Mizuno USA turn to Tegile storage technology to solve both their SAN and backup issues.
The next step in data security
With recent increased privacy concerns and computers becoming more powerful, the chance of hackers being able to crack smaller-sized RSA keys increases.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.
A strategic approach to identity relationship management
ForgeRock commissioned Forrester to evaluate companies’ IAM practices and requirements when it comes to customer-facing scenarios versus employee-facing ones.