Feeds

Boffins build eye-controlled interface out of game-console cams

£40 device lets you play Pong just by looking at it

Protecting against web application threats using SSL

Neurotechnologists in London have invented a £40 device that lets you control computers with your eyes.

Costing hundreds of times less than existing 3D eye tech it could revolutionise the life of the disabled say the team at Imperial University, allowing users to direct a wheelchair by simply looking at where they want it to go.

3D eye control tech developed at Imperial College, credit video screengrab

Built with game console cameras and £3 glasses, the device is hundreds of times cheaper than alternatives

Eye control tech has existed before but this device radically reduces costs and could help the lives of millions of people suffering from Multiple Sclerosis, Parkinson’s, muscular dystrophy, spinal cord injuries or amputees.

Built with simple off-the-shelf components, the researchers strung together the GT3D device using two fast video game console cameras, each costing less than £20 each and a £3 pair of glasses. Info it can relay to a Windows or Linux system via wifi or USB.

The cameras constantly take pictures of the eye, working out where the pupil is pointing, data which researchers use to work out exactly where a person is looking on the screen. Clicking is achieved by winking.

The cameras also use more detailed calibrations to work out the 3D gaze of the subjects – determining how far into the distance users are looking.

Dr Aldo Faisal, Lecturer in Neurotechnology at Imperial's Department of Bioengineering and the Department of Computing, said:

Crucially, we have achieved two things: we have built a 3D eye tracking system hundreds of times cheaper than commercial systems and used it to build a real-time brain machine interface that allows patients to interact more smoothly and more quickly than existing invasive technologies that are tens of thousands of times more expensive.

This is frugal innovation; developing smarter software and piggy-backing existing hardware to create devices that can help people worldwide independent of their healthcare circumstances.

Demonstrated initially by getting students to control a game of Pong with their eyes, the team foresee the interface as capable of much more complex tasks such as controlling a robot prosthetic arm.

®

'Ultra-low-cost 3D gaze estimation: an intuitive high information throughput compliment to direct brain–machine interfaces' by WW Abbott and A A Faisal is published in The Journal of Neural Engineering

Reducing the cost and complexity of web vulnerability management

More from The Register

next story
PORTAL TO ELSEWHERE scried in small galaxy far, far away
Supermassive black hole dominates titchy star formation
Boffins say they've got Lithium batteries the wrong way around
Surprises at the nano-scale mean our ideas about how they charge could be all wrong
Edge Research Lab to tackle chilly LOHAN's final test flight
Our US allies to probe potential Vulture 2 servo freeze
Europe prepares to INVADE comet: Rosetta landing site chosen
No word yet on whether backup site is labelled 'K'
Cracked it - Vulture 2 power podule fires servos for 4 HOURS
Pixhawk avionics juice issue sorted, onwards to Spaceport America
Archaeologists and robots on hunt for more Antikythera pieces
How much of the world's oldest computer can they find?
Who wants to be there as history is made at the launch of our LOHAN space project?
Two places available in the chase plane above the desert
prev story

Whitepapers

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops
Balancing user privacy and privileged access, in accordance with compliance frameworks and legislation. Evaluating any potential remote control choice.
WIN a very cool portable ZX Spectrum
Win a one-off portable Spectrum built by legendary hardware hacker Ben Heck
Storage capacity and performance optimization at Mizuno USA
Mizuno USA turn to Tegile storage technology to solve both their SAN and backup issues.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
The next step in data security
With recent increased privacy concerns and computers becoming more powerful, the chance of hackers being able to crack smaller-sized RSA keys increases.