Feeds

Google sued over mobile Chrome by patent firm

Smart, simplified navigation system fingered

Beginner's guide to SSL certificates

Google’s mobile Chrome browser is facing its first patent suit in a Texas court.

EMG Technology has accused Google of infringing a patent covering simplified navigation on smartphones and tablets.

EMG, based in Santa Monica, California, is seeking unspecified damages and the standard injunction preventing the distribution and sale of the Chrome mobile browser in the US.

The patent in question is US Patent 7,441,196 C1 ('196) and can be seen here.

Google was unavailable to comment at the time of writing.

The action has been filed in the litigant-friendly District Court for the Eastern District of Texas, Tyler Division. Small companies, especially, thrive there. XML development specialist i4i and web technologies company Eolas have both launched successful suits against the world's largest software company here.

In a suit dating back to 1999, Eolas claimed Internet Explorer violated one of its patents on opening third-party applications like Flash within a browser. Eolas settled in 2007 after Microsoft lost the first case but won an appeal on the ruling that required the company to pay Eolas more than $500m. The settlement amount was undisclosed.

i4i claimed Word 2003 and 2007 violated XML patents it owned. The case went all the way to the US Supreme Court, where Microsoft lost and was ordered to pay $300m in damages.

Plenty of other giants have been taken to court in East Texas by minnows while the elite – Hewlett-Packard, Cisco and Nokia among them – have not been averse to duelling in the jurisdiction.

There is every chance device-makers who use the Chrome mobile browser will also be drawn into the Vietnam that is East Texas. Elliot Gottfurcht, managing member and lead inventor of EMG's patent portfolio, in a statement on the Google prosecution here pointed to mobile devices from Samsung that are also using Chrome Mobile.

Having settled with Microsoft over IE, Eolas went on to prosecute Adobe Systems, Apple, Google, the former Sun Microsystems, YouTube, Blockbuster, JP Morgan Chase, JC Penny and Playboy Enterprises over the concept of in-browser applications and most plug-ins – though it was less successful in that case.

EMG Technology previously slapped Apple with a patent infringement lawsuit over the iPhone's browser. ®

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

More from The Register

next story
Phones 4u slips into administration after EE cuts ties with Brit mobe retailer
More than 5,500 jobs could be axed if rescue mission fails
JINGS! Microsoft Bing called Scots indyref RIGHT!
Redmond sporran metrics get one in the ten ring
Driving with an Apple Watch could land you with a £100 FINE
Bad news for tech-addicted fanbois behind the wheel
Phones 4u website DIES as wounded mobe retailer struggles to stay above water
Founder blames 'ruthless network partners' for implosion
Sony says year's losses will be FOUR TIMES DEEPER than thought
Losses of more than $2 BILLION loom over troubled Japanese corp
Radio hams can encrypt, in emergencies, says Ofcom
Consultation promises new spectrum and hints at relaxed licence conditions
Why Oracle CEO Larry Ellison had to go ... Except he hasn't
Silicon Valley's veteran seadog in piratical Putin impression
Big Content Australia just blew a big hole in its credibility
AHEDA's research on average content prices did not expose methodology, so appears less than rigourous
prev story

Whitepapers

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops
Balancing user privacy and privileged access, in accordance with compliance frameworks and legislation. Evaluating any potential remote control choice.
WIN a very cool portable ZX Spectrum
Win a one-off portable Spectrum built by legendary hardware hacker Ben Heck
Storage capacity and performance optimization at Mizuno USA
Mizuno USA turn to Tegile storage technology to solve both their SAN and backup issues.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
The next step in data security
With recent increased privacy concerns and computers becoming more powerful, the chance of hackers being able to crack smaller-sized RSA keys increases.