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Retina MacBook Pro nukes Apple's green credentials

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The tightly packed new Apple MacBook Pro prevents the laptop from meeting requirements laid down by eco-friendly technology catalogue EPEAT.

The Electronic Product Environmental Assessment Tool (EPEAT) announced on Monday that the shiny Retina-display lap warmer is "difficult to disassemble for upgrades, repairs, and recycling - and could force the green-minded to rethink Apple loyalties".

The iPad and iPhone maker pulled all 39 of its products from the EPEAT's registry of "green gadgets" last week. All of the company's gear previously had gold ratings from EPEAT.

It's a shock turnabout because Apple has long prided itself on how environmentally friendly its gadgets are, boasting its green credentials and in particular the gold certification, until now of course.

Teardown website iFixit speculated that the glued-on battery in the Pro is to blame. The EPEAT standards specify that machines must be easy to disassemble in order for parts to be recycled or upgraded [PDF].

iFixit writers described their experience of taking apart the new MacBook Pro:

That’s why it’s such a problem when manufacturers glue batteries into place with industrial-strength adhesive. When we originally tore down the Retina MacBook Pro, we could not separate the battery from the upper case. The next day, after a lot of elbow grease, we were finally able to get them apart—but in the process punctured the battery, leaking hazardous goo all over.

El Reg asked Apple to clarify why it withdrew from the certification process. We have yet to hear back from Cupertino.

The lack of EPEAT certification disqualifies US government departments and schools from buying Apple's reassuringly expensive gear as they have to abide by environment-supporting rules when purchasing technology. ®

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