Feeds

Burnt Samsung Galaxy S III singed by external source, probe reveals

Microwave to dry it out, it seems

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

Pictures showing a heat-damaged Samsung Galaxy S III smartphone were seemingly the result of a bonkers bid to dry out a wet handset by heating it in a microwave oven.

The snaps appeared online last month. They showed an S III with burn damage down near the phone's Micro USB port. The battery was intact and undamaged.

Samsung quickly said it was reaching out to get hold of the device to investigate the damage.

This weekend, it published the results of the probe, conducted by a UK-based third-party fire damage testing operation, Fire Investigations.

FI reported that "the heat damage does not appear to have been from an external heat flux, such as a naked flame". Rather, "the heat damage to the device appears to have been generated from within the device".

Inside the device? That points the finger at the phone, surely? Not quite - the energy was not generated by the device, FI concluded. "Based on the observed physical damage to the internal components, in particular the electrical components attached to the PCB, the heat does not appear to have been generated from energy within the device but from an external source," it said.

The external source, in FI's opinion, was microwave energy.

FI's report suggests other tests be carried out to confirm this, particularly an investigation of the cradle unit it believes the phone was slotted into when the damage took place.

But that now seems unnecessary. After publication of the FI report's conclusion by Samsung this past weekend, the poster of the original snaps admitted online: "The damage to the phone was caused by another person, although they were attempting to recover the phone from water… It occurred due to a large amount of external and there was no fault with the phone."

Reading between the lines of the FI report and the response: someone put the phone in a microwave to boil away the water that had penetrated the casing. ®

Thanks to reader Kris for the tip

Providing a secure and efficient Helpdesk

More from The Register

next story
TEEN RAMPAGE: Kids in iPhone 6 'Will it bend' YouTube 'prank'
iPhones bent in Norwich? As if the place wasn't weird enough
George Clooney, WikiLeaks' lawyer wife hand out burner phones to wedding guests
Day 4: 'News'-papers STILL rammed with Clooney nuptials
iPAD-FONDLING fanboi sparks SECURITY ALERT at Sydney airport
Breaches screening rules cos Apple SCREEN ROOLZ, ok?
Crouching tiger, FAST ASLEEP dragon: Smugglers can't shift iPhone 6s
China's grey market reports 'sluggish' sales of Apple mobe
A moment of brilliance? UPnP for Internet of Stuff lightbulbs
Thus doth tech of future illuminate present, etc
Apple's new iPhone 6 vulnerable to last year's TouchID fingerprint hack
But unsophisticated thieves need not attempt this trick
How the FLAC do I tell MP3s from lossless audio?
Can you hear the difference? Can anyone?
prev story

Whitepapers

Forging a new future with identity relationship management
Learn about ForgeRock's next generation IRM platform and how it is designed to empower CEOS's and enterprises to engage with consumers.
Storage capacity and performance optimization at Mizuno USA
Mizuno USA turn to Tegile storage technology to solve both their SAN and backup issues.
The next step in data security
With recent increased privacy concerns and computers becoming more powerful, the chance of hackers being able to crack smaller-sized RSA keys increases.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.
A strategic approach to identity relationship management
ForgeRock commissioned Forrester to evaluate companies’ IAM practices and requirements when it comes to customer-facing scenarios versus employee-facing ones.