Feeds

Google nixes extra wireless attachments to its new Kansas fibres

That pipe isn't fat enough to interest us

Eight steps to building an HP BladeSystem

Google has rejected overtures from a Kansas non-profit to integrate their wireless solution for the digitally challenged, saying that it didn't fit into their licensing model.

Connecting for Good is a non-profit organisation aiming to get people in Kansas connected, and had hoped to work with the Chocolate Factory which is in the process of rolling out fibre connections to homes across the city, but Google's deployment is designed to show off what a gigabit connection can do rather than linking in the homes with no connectivity at all.

Kansas was selected by Google as a test city last year, and since then the search giant has been conducting various polls to see what people want and what they'll pay for it, and recently started sending engineers up poles to string fibre-optic cables around the city. Connecting for Good and The Rosedale Development Association were hoping to resell that connectivity, using wireless to patch connections into low-income homes, but now Google has told them that won't be happening.

It's easy to see Google's point - the deployment is specifically intended to test how super-fast internet access changes internet use. Always-on connectivity has changed how the internet is used and perceived, and ramping up the speed might lead to a similar change. Google wants to be first to establish if that's true - subsidising wi-fi links to poor people won't help there.

Not that Google isn't planning to stretch connections beyond the wealthy, connecting the disconnected is part of the plan - but connecting them with fibre, not radios. Google's latest research shows that 17 per cent of Kansas residents were contributing nothing at all to Google's profits, by not using the internet, while eight per cent were limiting their revenue-generating potential by relying on dial-up or "slow speed wireless" connections.

The non-profits aren't giving up, there's bandwidth to be had elsewhere and the local paper is still pointing out the merits of the plan while being careful not to offend the Chocolate Factory. Those schemes will continue trying to provide some sort of connectivity while Google remains focused on finding out what people will do when they've got bags and bags of bandwidth. ®

Bridging the IT gap between rising business demands and ageing tools

More from The Register

next story
Auntie remains MYSTIFIED by that weekend BBC iPlayer and website outage
Still doing 'forensics' on the caching layer – Beeb digi wonk
Apple orders huge MOUNTAIN of 80 MILLION 'Air' iPhone 6s
Bigger, harder trouser bulges foretold for fanbois
GoTenna: How does this 'magic' work?
An ideal product if you believe the Earth is flat
Telstra to KILL 2G network by end of 2016
GSM now stands for Grave-Seeking-Mobile network
Seeking LTE expert to insert small cells into BT customers' places
Is this the first step to a FON-a-like 4G network?
Yorkshire cops fail to grasp principle behind BT Fon Wi-Fi network
'Prevent people that are passing by to hook up to your network', pleads plod
BlackBerry: Toss the server, mate... BES is in the CLOUD now
BlackBerry Enterprise Services takes aim at SMEs - but there's a catch
prev story

Whitepapers

Top three mobile application threats
Prevent sensitive data leakage over insecure channels or stolen mobile devices.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Boost IT visibility and business value
How building a great service catalog relieves pressure points and demonstrates the value of IT service management.
Designing a Defense for Mobile Applications
Learn about the various considerations for defending mobile applications - from the application architecture itself to the myriad testing technologies.
Build a business case: developing custom apps
Learn how to maximize the value of custom applications by accelerating and simplifying their development.