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A trio of cybercrooks that used malware to carry out electronic banking fraud have been jailed.

Pavel Cyganok and Ilja Zakrevski, from Lithuania and Estonia respectively, were arrested by detectives from the Met's Police Central eCrime Unit after a tip-off from their counterparts in Estonia. Cyganok was convicted and sentenced to five years behind bars while Ilja Zakrevski was sentenced to four years imprisonment.

Both men pleaded guilty at London's Southwark Crown Court on 24 May prior to a sentencing hearing on Friday.

Aldis Krummins, from Latvia, was jailed for two years after he was convicted for money-laundering crimes over the same scam, which netted an estimated £100,000 ($155,000). An estimated 1,000 computers were infected with malware.

The trio claimed victims not only in the UK but in Denmark, The Netherlands and New Zealand. The group used the SpyEye Trojan to compromise online banking accounts which were then used to finance the purchase of luxury goods, which were then sold on auction sites. ®

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