Feeds

WIPO signs new treaty for cross platform performers

ISOC welcomes recognition of the interwebs

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

A new treaty for the rights of audiovisual performers has been finalised by the World Intellectual Property Organization (WIPO) after 12 years of negotiations.

The treaty will give performers, for the first time, protection in the digital environment.

The new treaty, brokered in Beijing, will when implemented allow performers to share international audiovisual revenue with producers as well as grant performers moral rights over copyright or distortion of their performances.

The idea is to safeguard the rights of performers against the unauthorized use of their performances across platforms including television, film, video and the Internet.

ISOC welcomed the treaty but urged for WIPO members to take into “critical” account the effects of the “Internet and the digital revolution.”

“Coherent policies at national and international levels are needed to minimize uncertainty for Internet intermediaries and other stakeholders, and to foster Internet access and use, online innovation, investment, competition, and the free flow of information across borders,” ISOC said.

Australia was represented in Beijing by officials from the Attorney-General’s Department and the Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade, the Screen Producers Association of Australia and the Media Entertainment and Arts Alliance.

The Australian Government is expected to conduct a public consultation process to consider ratification of the treaty.

The act was signed by 131 WIPO member states and the treaty by 46 member states.

The treaty will enter into force once it has been ratified by 30 eligible parties, including countries or certain intergovernmental organisations. WIPO Director General Francis Gurry said the treaty was an important milestone toward closing the gap in the international rights system for audiovisual performers. “The international copyright framework will no longer discriminate against one set of performers,” he added. ®

Beginner's guide to SSL certificates

More from The Register

next story
Facebook pays INFINITELY MORE UK corp tax than in 2012
Thanks for the £3k, Zuck. Doh! you're IN CREDIT. Guess not
Facebook, Apple: LADIES! Why not FREEZE your EGGS? It's on the company!
No biological clockwatching when you work in Silicon Valley
Happiness economics is bollocks. Oh, UK.gov just adopted it? Er ...
Opportunity doesn't knock; it costs us instead
Sysadmin with EBOLA? Gartner's issued advice to debug your biz
Start hoarding cleaning supplies, analyst firm says, and assume your team will scatter
YARR! Pirates walk the plank: DMCA magnets sink in Google results
Spaffing copyrighted stuff over the web? No search ranking for you
Don't bother telling people if you lose their data, say Euro bods
You read that right – with the proviso that it's encrypted
Apple SILENCES Bose, YANKS headphones from stores
The, er, Beats go on after noise-cancelling spat
prev story

Whitepapers

Cloud and hybrid-cloud data protection for VMware
Learn how quick and easy it is to configure backups and perform restores for VMware environments.
A strategic approach to identity relationship management
ForgeRock commissioned Forrester to evaluate companies’ IAM practices and requirements when it comes to customer-facing scenarios versus employee-facing ones.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
Three 1TB solid state scorchers up for grabs
Big SSDs can be expensive but think big and think free because you could be the lucky winner of one of three 1TB Samsung SSD 840 EVO drives that we’re giving away worth over £300 apiece.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.