Feeds

Maude to gov IT suppliers: If you are rubbish you will be binned

Speaking of rubbish, those public sector buying frameworks...

Security for virtualized datacentres

Cabinet Office Minister Francis Maude will today warn some of the largest IT suppliers to government they may find themselves in the metaphorical public sector waste bin if their performance is rubbish.

After the champagne cocktails hair dryer treatment, integrators including Accenture, Atos, Steria, Capita, Capgemini, Logica and vendors HP and IBM will then have a chance to provide feedback to Crown Representatives on UK.gov's attitude to business.

Clearly in self-licking mode, Maude said the Treasury had saved £3.75bn in the year to 31 March 2011 by putting temporary controls on spending in areas such as advertising and marketing, ICT, property and recruitment.

The goal is to top £5bn in the current financial year and the Cabinet Office will seek to make these controls permanent in guidelines (PDF) published today.

Earlier this week, the Cabinet Office estimated it will shave £65m off its annual bill from Microsoft and £3m from SAP, however it spent north of £350m with those companies last fiscal year.

Maude will also reveal to suppliers that the Cabinet Office will monitor their output across the Crown as a whole, with formal information on individual firms used at the start and during the procurement process.

He admitted however that the Cabinet Office has some way to go yet before it can match the buying habits of the private sector.

"I want Whitehall procurement to become as sharp as the best businesses. Today, I will tell companies that we won't tolerate poor performance and that to work with us you will have to offer the best value for money," said Maude.

The Channel reckons the government should tidy up the plethora of large and small public sector buying frameworks that are running in parallel including CITHS, ITH&S and Sprint ii.

These multiple agreements only serve to confuse suppliers, buyers and do not exactly embody the concept of buying IT as a single entity. ®

Security for virtualized datacentres

More from The Register

next story
Phones 4u slips into administration after EE cuts ties with Brit mobe retailer
More than 5,500 jobs could be axed if rescue mission fails
JINGS! Microsoft Bing called Scots indyref RIGHT!
Redmond sporran metrics get one in the ten ring
Driving with an Apple Watch could land you with a £100 FINE
Bad news for tech-addicted fanbois behind the wheel
Phones 4u website DIES as wounded mobe retailer struggles to stay above water
Founder blames 'ruthless network partners' for implosion
Sony says year's losses will be FOUR TIMES DEEPER than thought
Losses of more than $2 BILLION loom over troubled Japanese corp
Radio hams can encrypt, in emergencies, says Ofcom
Consultation promises new spectrum and hints at relaxed licence conditions
Why Oracle CEO Larry Ellison had to go ... Except he hasn't
Silicon Valley's veteran seadog in piratical Putin impression
Big Content Australia just blew a big hole in its credibility
AHEDA's research on average content prices did not expose methodology, so appears less than rigourous
prev story

Whitepapers

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops
Balancing user privacy and privileged access, in accordance with compliance frameworks and legislation. Evaluating any potential remote control choice.
WIN a very cool portable ZX Spectrum
Win a one-off portable Spectrum built by legendary hardware hacker Ben Heck
Storage capacity and performance optimization at Mizuno USA
Mizuno USA turn to Tegile storage technology to solve both their SAN and backup issues.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
The next step in data security
With recent increased privacy concerns and computers becoming more powerful, the chance of hackers being able to crack smaller-sized RSA keys increases.