Feeds

Even Apples sometimes have worms in them, admits Cupertino

Sinful humans can drag down even angelic Macs

Security for virtualized datacentres

Mac computers can be buggy, Apple has finally admitted. Two days ago the firm quietly pulled the claim that the iOS PCs are immune to viruses from its website.

The purveyor of shinier-more-expensive desktops has replaced its former claim with the more cautious statement that Macs are "built to be safe".

The change was made to Apple's website on Sunday, according to Sophos.

Apple's site now lists features which make Macs "safer" – including download alerts, security updates and data encryption.

The previous write-up claimed: "It doesn't get PC viruses. A Mac doesn't get the thousands of viruses plaguing Windows-based computers."

Macs were notably breached by the Flashback Trojan early this year, which flourished in the absence of any action on Cupertino's part, swelling into a zombie army of 650,00 Mac machines.

Apple eventually grudgingly admitted that the infection existed and came up with a fix.

Dr Web has a timeline here. ®

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

Whitepapers

Forging a new future with identity relationship management
Learn about ForgeRock's next generation IRM platform and how it is designed to empower CEOS's and enterprises to engage with consumers.
Why cloud backup?
Combining the latest advancements in disk-based backup with secure, integrated, cloud technologies offer organizations fast and assured recovery of their critical enterprise data.
Win a year’s supply of chocolate
There is no techie angle to this competition so we're not going to pretend there is, but everyone loves chocolate so who cares.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
Intelligent flash storage arrays
Tegile Intelligent Storage Arrays with IntelliFlash helps IT boost storage utilization and effciency while delivering unmatched storage savings and performance.