Feeds

Microsoft rejects Google-Moto patent pact proposal

'Can't believe they told the press', lawyer tells press

Mobile application security vulnerability report

Microsoft has rejected a proposed offer by Motorola to settle patent disputes between the two companies that threaten to stop the flow of Moto's Android kit and Redmond's Xboxes and Windows gear into the US. This is after the software giant said it reckoned that Motorola was looking for "excessive" royalties.

Both Microsoft and Motorola are in danger of getting their goods halted at the border in the US over their disputes, with Redmond peeved at Android's use of calendar tech ActiveSync while Moto is demanding cash for video and wireless tech used in Xboxes and Windows OS.

But Microsoft didn't like the terms Motorola proposed for the two firms to cross-license each other's gear. The one-time leader of the tech world said Motorola was offering it 33c for the use of Microsoft's ActiveSync in each of Moto's Android phones, and that in return it wants a 2.25 per cent from every Xbox and 50c for every copy of Windows that uses its patents.

"While we welcome any good faith settlement effort, it's hard to apply that label to a demand that Microsoft pay royalties to Google far in excess of market rates, that refuses to license all the Microsoft patents infringed by Motorola, and that is promptly leaked to the press," Horacio Gutierrez, Microsoft's deputy general counsel, told The Register in an emailed statement.

"At a time when the FTC, prominent members of Congress and leading companies from across the industry are expressing concern about Google’s refusal to honor its obligations to standards bodies, this appears to be little more than an effort to change the subject.”

The US International Trade Commission has recommended halting imports of both Microsoft and Moto products that are tied up in the cases until the two firms sort it out.

Kirk Dailey, veep of intellectual property at Motorola Mobility, told Bloomberg about the settlement offer in an interview yesterday, pointing out that while it was keeping its 2.25 per cent demand for royalties on Xboxes, it was dropping the same demand for Windows products down to 50c.

"We’re hopeful they’re going to respond positively,” Dailey said.

He admitted that the 33c per phone it was offering to Microsoft was the same amount of money that it was going to be obligated to pay anyway as a bond before the product ban comes into effect, but he said it was more than what it had paid under a previous licence for ActiveSync. The phone ban is due on 17 July, unless President Barack Obama overturns it on public policy grounds.

Motorola did not return a request for comment. ®

The Power of One Brief: Top reasons to choose HP BladeSystem

More from The Register

next story
Stick a 4K in them: Super high-res TVs are DONE
4,000 pixels is niche now... Don't say we didn't warn you
BBC goes offline in MASSIVE COCKUP: Stephen Fry partly muzzled
Auntie tight-lipped as major outage rolls on
iPad? More like iFAD: We reveal why Apple fell into IBM's arms
But never fear fanbois, you're still lapping up iPhones, Macs
Philip K Dick 'Nazi alternate reality' story to be made into TV series
Amazon Studios, Ridley Scott firm to produce The Man in the High Castle
Amazon Reveals One Weird Trick: A Loss On Almost $20bn In Sales
Investors really hate it: Share price plunge as growth SLOWS in key AWS division
Bose says today is F*** With Dre Day: Beats sued in patent battle
Music gear giant seeks some of that sweet, sweet Apple pie
There's NOTHING on TV in Europe – American video DOMINATES
Even France's mega subsidies don't stop US content onslaught
You! Pirate! Stop pirating, or we shall admonish you politely. Repeatedly, if necessary
And we shall go about telling people you smell. No, not really
Too many IT conferences to cover? MICROSOFT to the RESCUE!
Yet more word of cuts emerges from Redmond
prev story

Whitepapers

Designing a Defense for Mobile Applications
Learn about the various considerations for defending mobile applications - from the application architecture itself to the myriad testing technologies.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Top 8 considerations to enable and simplify mobility
In this whitepaper learn how to successfully add mobile capabilities simply and cost effectively.
Seven Steps to Software Security
Seven practical steps you can begin to take today to secure your applications and prevent the damages a successful cyber-attack can cause.
Boost IT visibility and business value
How building a great service catalog relieves pressure points and demonstrates the value of IT service management.