Feeds

Assange: Australian neglect made me flee to Ecuador embassy

Oz should have told Sweden, UK to leave me alone. Or else

Next gen security for virtualised datacentres

Julian Assange has spent his third night in the Ecuadorian embassy in London as he continued to await the outcome of his plea for political asylum from the South American country.

In the meantime, the WikiLeaker-in-chief has been grumbling to a radio station that his homeland of Australia had ditched him in his hour of need.

On Thursday, he told Australian Broadcasting Corporation (ABC) that the country where he was born had made an "effective declaration of abandonment" by declining to apply any political pressure to prevent Assange from being extradited to Sweden to face allegations of sexual molestation, rape and coercion.

He admitted, according to the Associated Press, that it was unclear whether Ecuador would recognise his plight.

"We had heard that the Ecuadoreans were sympathetic in relation to my struggles and the struggles of the organisation with the United States," Assange explained to ABC.

However, Ecuador's President, Rafael Correa, reportedly said yesterday that Assange's asylum bid was still being carefully considered, and he did not indicate how quickly a decision might be made.

"We are going to have to discuss with and seek the opinions of other countries. We don't wish to offend anyone, least of all a country we hold in such deep regard as the United Kingdom," said Correa to reporters, after he arrived in Brazil for a climate summit.

He added: "Once a decision is made we can talk about safe passage and such things."

That's a statement which appears to suggest that Assange will indeed be granted political asylum in Ecuador: but which acknowledges the fact that he will be unable to reach South America without British consent.

As we reported on Wednesday, Assange's bizarre plea for political asylum meant that the 40-year-old had broken one of the conditions of his UK bail terms, which had been in force since his arrest in December 2010.

He had been cuffed, courtesy of a European Arrest Warrant, by the Met's extradition unit on behalf of Swedish authorities.

By taking up residence in the Ecuadorian Embassy's flat in Knightsbridge, London, the computer hacker broke a curfew set out by Scotland Yard, which demanded that Assange remain holed up at his bail address between the hours of 22.00 and 8.00.

The moment he steps outside the door, Assange will be re-arrested under the Bail Act by police officers currently camped outside the embassy.

Meanwhile, Assange's celebrity friends, some of whom raised more than £200,000 bail for his release, expressed surprise and embarrassment in response to Assange's actions.

Long-term supporter Jemima Khan said on Twitter yesterday that she "personally would like to see Assange confront the rape allegations in Sweden and the 2 women at the centre have a right to a response".

Before adding: "BUT there is no doubt that Assange has a real fear of being extradited to the US nor that the US gov is out to get WikiLeaks."

She later clarified her comment by stating: "My tweet misinterpreted. Obvs I'd like Assange to answer allegations & clear his name but I understand why he's taken such drastic action."

Earlier this week, Australian Prime Minister Julia Gillard said the WikiLeaks founder has enjoyed extensive consular assistance from Oz and added that he would continue to enjoy it. ®

The essential guide to IT transformation

More from The Register

next story
Goog says patch⁵⁰ your Chrome
64-bit browser loads cat vids FIFTEEN PERCENT faster!
Chinese hackers spied on investigators of Flight MH370 - report
Classified data on flight's disappearance pinched
NIST to sysadmins: clean up your SSH mess
Too many keys, too badly managed
Scratched PC-dispatch patch patched, hatched in batch rematch
Windows security update fixed after triggering blue screens (and screams) of death
Researchers camouflage haxxor traps with fake application traffic
Honeypots sweetened to resemble actual workloads, complete with 'secure' logins
prev story

Whitepapers

Top 10 endpoint backup mistakes
Avoid the ten endpoint backup mistakes to ensure that your critical corporate data is protected and end user productivity is improved.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Backing up distributed data
Eliminating the redundant use of bandwidth and storage capacity and application consolidation in the modern data center.
The essential guide to IT transformation
ServiceNow discusses three IT transformations that can help CIOs automate IT services to transform IT and the enterprise
Next gen security for virtualised datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.