Feeds

Chinese search newbie Jike takes on Baidu and Google

It's government-owned but promises 'natural' search

5 things you didn’t know about cloud backup

Chinese government-owned search engine Jike took another step towards competing with the big boys, Baidu and Google, a year after its launch by announcing advertising on the site.

Jike was set up by state mouthpiece the People’s Daily and launched to great fanfare by former ping pong superstar Deng Yaping in June 2011.

Up until now it has been finding its feet, slowly expanding its search services beyond news to include web pages, images and video, launching an Android app and readying a commercial strategy.

It’s looking to attract particularly small and medium sized firms to advertise on the site and plans to offer free advertising for up to 1,000 SMEs in the next three years, according to China Daily.

A Jike statement translated by the state-run paper notes that “Jike.com still has a long way to go compared with Baidu or Google”, adding that its goal is to "transmit information in a fair and barrier-free manner" and "provide the most natural search results to its users".

Jike logo

Well, as natural as search in the People’s Republic can be, given the massive government-imposed censorship of online content.

The site looks almost identical to market leader Baidu, even down to the blue and red colour scheme, and will have to do something pretty special to make a serious imprint on the market.

At the moment it doesn't really seem to have a USP, while its domestic rival - which has a market share of around 80 per cent - has expanded into the cloud storage, mobile and browser space.

Google, meanwhile, seems set on antagonising the authorities with a new feature designed to notify users when their searches are being blocked by the censors.

For the record, Jike roughly translates to “immediate” in Mandarin, although the name was apparently also chosen because it sounds a little bit like “geek”.

Its owners at the People’s Daily unfortunately don't seem to have checked the Urban Dictionary to see what other meanings are floating around.

These range from “bitchassness times four” to “One who rides shotgun in a vehicle and yells out verbal insults to pedestrians walking about”, and a LOT worse in between. ®

Boost IT visibility and business value

More from The Register

next story
6 Obvious Reasons Why Facebook Will Ban This Article (Thank God)
Clampdown on clickbait ... and El Reg is OK with this
So, Apple won't sell cheap kit? Prepare the iOS garden wall WRECKING BALL
It can throw the low cost race if it looks to the cloud
EE accused of silencing customer gripes on social media pages
Hello. HELLO. Can EVERYTHING EVERYWHERE HEAR ME?!
Time Warner Cable customers SQUEAL as US network goes offline
A rude awakening: North Americans greeted with outage drama
Shoot-em-up: Sony Online Entertainment hit by 'large scale DDoS attack'
Games disrupted as firm struggles to control network
BT customers face broadband and landline price hikes
Poor punters won't be affected, telecoms giant claims
Broadband slow and expensive? Blame Telstra says CloudFlare
Won't peer, will gouge for Internet transit
Netflix swallows yet another bitter pill, inks peering deal with TWC
Net neutrality crusader once again pays up for priority access
prev story

Whitepapers

Best practices for enterprise data
Discussing how technology providers have innovated in order to solve new challenges, creating a new framework for enterprise data.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Advanced data protection for your virtualized environments
Find a natural fit for optimizing protection for the often resource-constrained data protection process found in virtual environments.
How modern custom applications can spur business growth
Learn how to create, deploy and manage custom applications without consuming or expanding the need for scarce, expensive IT resources.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?