Feeds

Sun dying on its arse behind the Oracle walls

Lipsticked schweinhund looking poorly

HP ProLiant Gen8: Integrated lifecycle automation

Analysis Playing with the annual revenue numbers Oracle has just released indicates Sun HW-related revenues fell by $1.4 billion from 2011 to 2012.

We'd better explain our reasoning. Oracle hardware products and support revenues were $6.944 billion in its fiscal 2011. They were $6.302 billion in fiscal 2012, a fall of $642 million. Some Oracle hardware did very well though.

Oracle president Mark Hurd said:

"Our engineered systems business is now operating at well over a billion dollar revenue run rate. For the year, the Exadata, Exalogic, Exalytics, SPARC SuperCluster and the Oracle Big Data Appliance product group grew over 100 per cent year-over-year.”

Let's subtract the engineered systems business from the hardware products and support number to arrive at what is likely the residual Sun hardware business number, plus the Pillar storage array business, whatever that is worth these days. We'll assume that engineered systems annual revenue run rate is $1.25 billion ("well over a billion dollar … run rate") and was $500 million in fy2011 (grew over 100 per cent year-on-year.")

Sun hardware business revenue decline

Feed these numbers into a spreadsheet and the residual Sun business was worth $6.444 billion in fy2011 and $5.052 billion in fy2012; a fall of 21.6 per cent. It puts the comments of the fired Keith Block about Sun being a dog into perspective. The chart shows the colourful horror story.

Extrapolating the current trends Oracle's engineered systems revenue will overtake the rump Sun hardware business revenue in 2014.

If, and it's a big "if", our numbers are anywhere near accurate the residual Sun hardware business is destined for the scrapheap and Pillar's Axiom arrays have nowhere left to go. The writing is on the wall. Oracle's hardware future is engineered systems and that is that. You don't need to be Mark Hurd to see it. ®

Note; comments to this forum topic please.

Eight steps to building an HP BladeSystem

More from The Register

next story
THUD! WD plonks down SIX TERABYTE 'consumer NAS' fatboy
Now that's a LOT of porn or pirated movies. Or, you know, other consumer stuff
EU's top data cops to meet Google, Microsoft et al over 'right to be forgotten'
Plan to hammer out 'coherent' guidelines. Good luck chaps!
US judge: YES, cops or feds so can slurp an ENTIRE Gmail account
Crooks don't have folders labelled 'drug records', opines NY beak
Manic malware Mayhem spreads through Linux, FreeBSD web servers
And how Google could cripple infection rate in a second
FLAPE – the next BIG THING in storage
Find cold data with flash, transmit it from tape
Seagate chances ARM with NAS boxes for the SOHO crowd
There's an Atom-powered offering, too
prev story

Whitepapers

Seven Steps to Software Security
Seven practical steps you can begin to take today to secure your applications and prevent the damages a successful cyber-attack can cause.
Consolidation: The Foundation for IT Business Transformation
In this whitepaper learn how effective consolidation of IT and business resources can enable multiple, meaningful business benefits.
Designing a Defense for Mobile Applications
Learn about the various considerations for defending mobile applications - from the application architecture itself to the myriad testing technologies.
Build a business case: developing custom apps
Learn how to maximize the value of custom applications by accelerating and simplifying their development.
Consolidation: the foundation for IT and business transformation
In this whitepaper learn how effective consolidation of IT and business resources can enable multiple, meaningful business benefits.