Feeds

NBN Co preps revised access undertaking

New agreement expected by year-end

New hybrid storage solutions

NBN Co, the company building Australia’s National Broadband Network, will revisit the rules and pricing for access to its network in response to feedback from access seekers.

The decision, which has been approved by the ACCC, means formal regulatory approval of the Special Access Undertaking (SAU), originally due in September, will be delayed until next year.

The industry had pushed back over several aspects of the SAU: the idea that the document would provide a 30-year regulatory framework wasn’t popular, and retailers were unhappy that the SAU sought to keep NBN Co’s pricing regimes out of reach of the ACCC.

The prices that the company had put in place also caused concern among ISPs; in particular, the cost of the CVC (connectivity virtual circuit – the pipe that aggregates multiple customers between a fibre service area and an NBN point of interconnect).

While NBN Co will still seek to retain control over prices, the organization has hinted at possible price reductions for CVCs.

“What doesn’t change in the revised approach is our commitment to maintain the affordability of our prices,” said Jim Hassell, NBN Co Head of Product Management and Industry Relations.

“The approach continues to lock-in the prices of key products for five years, maintains price controls over all products, and in addition now confirms NBN Co’s intention to decrease the price of the Connectivity Virtual Circuit (CVC) as demand increases.”

NBN Co has also yielded some ground regarding ACCC oversight of its prices, saying it will provide “a more explicit role” for the regulator in assessing its prices.

NBN Co has now proposed breaking up the SAU into different modules that will operate at different time scales. Only the “foundation” rules of the SAU will be set over 30 years, with other modules covering five- and ten-year time scales.

The revised SAU is to be completed before the end of the year, so El Reg will expect continuing lobbying efforts from retailers in the meantime. ®

Providing a secure and efficient Helpdesk

More from The Register

next story
Found inside ISIS terror chap's laptop: CELINE DION tunes
REPORT: Stash of terrorist material found in Syria Dell box
Show us your Five-Eyes SECRETS says Privacy International
Refusal to disclose GCHQ canteen menus and prices triggers Euro Human Rights Court action
Radio hams can encrypt, in emergencies, says Ofcom
Consultation promises new spectrum and hints at relaxed licence conditions
Heavy VPN users are probably pirates, says BBC
And ISPs should nab 'em on our behalf
Former Bitcoin Foundation chair pleads guilty to money-laundering charge
Charlie Shrem plea deal could still get him five YEARS in chokey
NORKS ban Wi-Fi and satellite internet at embassies
Crackdown on tardy diplomatic sysadmins providing accidental unfiltered internet access
prev story

Whitepapers

Providing a secure and efficient Helpdesk
A single remote control platform for user support is be key to providing an efficient helpdesk. Retain full control over the way in which screen and keystroke data is transmitted.
Top 5 reasons to deploy VMware with Tegile
Data demand and the rise of virtualization is challenging IT teams to deliver storage performance, scalability and capacity that can keep up, while maximizing efficiency.
Reg Reader Research: SaaS based Email and Office Productivity Tools
Read this Reg reader report which provides advice and guidance for SMBs towards the use of SaaS based email and Office productivity tools.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.
Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops
Balancing user privacy and privileged access, in accordance with compliance frameworks and legislation. Evaluating any potential remote control choice.