Feeds

Post-quake Japan warms to foreign tie-ups

BT sees huge opportunities in land of the rising sun

Build a business case: developing custom apps

The massive earthquake and tsunami which struck north-east Japan in 2011 has had an unintended impact on corporate strategy which could give foreign tech firms unprecedented opportunities to grow their business in the country, according to BT.

Haruno Yoshida, president of BT Japan, told The Reg at the firm's Asia Pacific Influencers Summit in Hong Kong last week that the events of 11 March 2011 had a profound effect on many domestic businesses, forcing them to look outside the region for growth.

“BT has been in Japan for 30 years but we weren’t as successful as we wanted to be,” she said. “Then all of a sudden 11 March happened and at the top of companies they realised how vulnerable it is to focus only on your own market – that there shouldn’t be such a focus on domestic Japan.”

She said that whereas in the past dogmatic IT leaders had “pushed the Americans back” and tried to protect their market, BT is now seeing good momentum driven by a healthy level of globalisation.

“But you can’t be a Black Ship,” she warned, in a reference to the western vessels which heralded the forced re-opening of trade ties with Japan in the 1850s.

“Japan is looking for help, but only if BT is willing to be a trusted partner offering a helping hand can there be true opportunity.”

Ovum senior analyst Claudio Castelli, said that BT in particular could be in a great position to benefit from this softening Japanese stance.

“Japanese companies in the domestic market are limited in terms of growth. They have to look outside to grow and Asia is booming so they’re looking to take these opportunities,” he told The Reg.

“BT can provide that gateway to other places.”

The British telco giant is also looking to expand its partnerships in Japan with firms like Hitachi, Fujitsu and NEC to off-set the advantage that firms like AT&T and Verizon – who have historically been more successful there – have had, Castelli added.

However, he urged caution when talking about 11 March as some kind of tipping point, arguing that the need to internationalise operations and work more with foreign partners domestically has been permeating the boardrooms of Tokyo for some time.

Firms like Sony and NEC are shadows of the technology behemoths they once were, while the country's semiconductor and LCD industries are struggling to stay relevant on the global stage.®

Build a business case: developing custom apps

More from The Register

next story
iPad? More like iFAD: We reveal why Apple fell into IBM's arms
But never fear fanbois, you're still lapping up iPhones, Macs
Sonos AXES support for Apple's iOS4 and 5
Want to use your iThing? You can't - it's too old
Amazon says Hachette should lower ebook prices, pay authors more
Oh yeah ... and a 30% cut for Amazon to seal the deal
Philip K Dick 'Nazi alternate reality' story to be made into TV series
Amazon Studios, Ridley Scott firm to produce The Man in the High Castle
Joe Average isn't worth $10 a year to Mark Zuckerberg
The Social Network deflates the PC resurgence with mobile-only usage prediction
Chips are down at Broadcom: Thousands of workers laid off
Cellphone baseband device biz shuttered
Feel free to BONK on the TUBE, says Transport for London
Plus: Almost NOBODY uses pay-by-bonk on buses - Visa
Twitch rich as Google flicks $1bn hitch switch, claims snitch
Gameplay streaming biz and search king refuse to deny fresh gobble rumors
Stick a 4K in them: Super high-res TVs are DONE
4,000 pixels is niche now... Don't say we didn't warn you
prev story

Whitepapers

Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Boost IT visibility and business value
How building a great service catalog relieves pressure points and demonstrates the value of IT service management.
Why and how to choose the right cloud vendor
The benefits of cloud-based storage in your processes. Eliminate onsite, disk-based backup and archiving in favor of cloud-based data protection.
The Essential Guide to IT Transformation
ServiceNow discusses three IT transformations that can help CIO's automate IT services to transform IT and the enterprise.
Maximize storage efficiency across the enterprise
The HP StoreOnce backup solution offers highly flexible, centrally managed, and highly efficient data protection for any enterprise.